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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Clarksville, TN
    Posts
    11

    Post

    I recently attempted to remove a fairly strong colony of bees from a neighbors camper(utility compartment). Tried the funnel? method. Pulled out all the comb and used twin to secure in empty frames, them placed in hive body below camper. Most bees stayed in the camper however. Fashioned a funnel out of screen and tried to duct tape to opening where the hive was. Checked every other day for progress, but found duct tape was not holding to camper very well, consequently bees were getting back in. Long story short now, neighbor needed camper and killed remaining bees, but several bees did take up residence in the hive body I provided( maybe enough to cover one frame. They have stayed in there for a week after I brought the hive home. Questions: How would I know if i got the queen(I'm not that good at identifying and finding)? Should i purchase a queen for this hive with so few bees? Any thought/suggestions appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Milton, Vermont
    Posts
    307

    Post

    If the bees kept going back into the camper you most likely do not have the queen in the hive. If she is in there you should find eggs and brood in the hive. I personally would not buy a queen for so few bees as I live in north and our warm season is too short for them to build up enough to survive the winter. You could add brood and bees from another hive and then add a queen.
    It is what it is.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
    Posts
    769

    Post

    There are to few bees for a queen. another idea is join them useing newspaper with another hive mabe one that may be a bit weak.
    Mitch KD8IMF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
    Posts
    445

    Post

    You live in Tennesee.

    It is not too late in the year for you to buy a queen, though later you may need to transfer in brood to beef the hive up. A single frame might not build up in numbers quickly enough to form a warm winter cluster.

    Here in Kansas there a gent that does late splits, but he ALWAYS checks them BEFORE winter and adds brood and honey if needed.

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