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Thread: Winter project

  1. #1
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    Jun 2002
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    Dousman,Wi.U.S.A.
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    Here in S.E. Wisconsin we have 1-3 inches of fresh white coming today. Have started working in the basement tacking new frames together. Good job for bad weather. Anyone else "tacking" this time of year?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2003
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    Williston, NC, USA
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    1,779

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    Yessir, just cleaned a bunch of them on Saturday and they're in the freezer to kill off any wax worm larvae I may have missed. Will be putting new foundation into them tomorrow night. Also have some boxes to repair/repaint this week sometime. Want to be ready when the good weather finally does get here!

  3. #3
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    Sep 2003
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    Temecula, CA
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    Indeed. It's been a cold winter here so far this year as well! Below is a link to some of the honeyhouse/workshop projects that I've been doing.
    http://users.adelphia.net/~kamerrill/index008.htm

  4. #4
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    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
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    Hello Kamerrill et al,
    Bravo, a very neat set-up. I am a raw beginner who built his own hive boxes etc. from the plans on Beesource, complete with slatted racks, screened bottom board and the slide tray. For the tray I use white Formica that I reinforced underneath with runners. I purchased enough scrap formica from a kitchen builder for about five hives. What I like about it is that it is very easy to clean and I coat with food grade mineral oil that I also use in the fogger and it grabs anything that falls on it. Once again, a super looking set-up.

  5. #5
    You betcha, put together 100 deep frames together a little earlier this winter (glued and nailed). And waiting for the boiled linen seed oil to dry on them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Temecula, CA
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    Thanks!

    I too built an 'old style' slatted rack from the plans on the site but I liked the idea of switching around the direction of the slats so that they line up with the frames. In theory, the mites then have a free-fall down through the rack and on through the screen. I borrowed a new slatted rack from a friend, copied the dimensions, and did a quick production run in my woodshop. I am a hobbyist wood worker as well (another potentially expensive hobby!) and I have loads of fun making equipment.

    Take care,
    Kurt

    [This message has been edited by kamerrill (edited January 27, 2004).]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
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    514

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    Yep, Built 50 clip pallets and 50 lids in December, before it got "cold" here (central North Dakota). -26 this morning and supposed to reach a high temp. of -14 tomorrow!

    ------------------
    Gregg Stewart

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
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    I havent built any equipment lately but have been running the concrete mixer outside the last few days mixing up yeast patties.5 inches of new snow this morning so have been staying inside milking the coffee pot.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    930

    Question

    Do you farm your own yeast?

    In other words, are you a beer/wine/mead maker?

    ------------------
    --
    Scot Mc Pherson
    "Linux is a Journey, not a Guided Tour" ~ Me

  10. #10
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    Jun 2002
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    Dousman,Wi.U.S.A.
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    Hey Kamerill: Great pics thanks for sharing them with us. Karl

  11. #11
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    Jul 2000
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    NE Calif.
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    Nah,I buy it in 50 pound bags from one of the larger bee outfits.I dont make wine or beer (but I do drink my fair share).I have wondered if the residue from home brewing could be used.The yeast we feed is just a by-product of the breweries.

  12. #12
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    Oct 2001
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    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    It would be a simple process to prepare the yeast for bee consumption.

    When one filters wine/beer/mead what's left are the solids. The near 100% majority of this is yeast and proteins and as much of the fluid as the yeast can retain in saturation. To prepare the yeast, simply rinse it by adding clear water then filter it out again.

    Unfortunately, there would be little economy in doing this except in the large scale, if one were a hobbyist brewer one could collect the yeast into patties and keep moist in the frig (its quite safe and preserved in the alcohol). When one has collected enough would it warrant rinsing the yeast and wasting a filter on it.

    Perhaps its quite safe to just use the yeast patties as is without rinsing. I don't know, maybe I should just keep my mouth shut. Is the yeast we use in beekeeping prepared after the brewing process or is it "straight-up" by-product??

    ------------------
    --
    Scot Mc Pherson
    "Linux is a Journey, not a Guided Tour" ~ Me
    "Do or not do, there is no try" ~ Master Yoda

  13. #13
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    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
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    My thought was that it was just dried. No need to rinse something away that evaporates. But I do not know for sure.

  14. #14
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    Oct 2001
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    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
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    Well unless the wine or beer is kosher, it probably has a significant amount of sulphur residue in it as sulphur is an ordinary part of the wine and beer brewing process. Its one of the most common preservatives used in the food industry.

    Anyway I just wasn't sure ...

    Its proly ok.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    oneonta al.
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    A question for txbeeguy: You said you are putting boiled linen seed oil on your frames.
    Can you tell me why?>>>>Mark

  16. #16
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    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
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    Those of you building frames should keep in mind that now is the best time to mark each frame with some I. D. Hive theft is expected to increase this year.If you dont brand them,marking your initials and the year on each frame with a heavy black felt marker will work.This will also help in the future to know how old a particular comb is.You can even brush hot wax over the mark to seal it.The idea is to try to deter a would-be thief from going through with the theft.After the fact I dont think many hives are ever recovered.

  17. #17

    Lightbulb

    It's just a "bee friendly" wood preservative; I do the same with my hive bodies before I paint them. On the frames, I think it helps them last longer by cutting down on the splitting and cracking around the end bars. It's probably a step that's not absolutely necessary but I've got frames that still look new after almost ten years of use. If you decided to do it, leave plenty of time for them to dry (since it's an "oil", it will take a minimum of two or three weeks to dry).

  18. #18
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    Jan 2003
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    oneonta al.
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    Thank you ,Txbeeguy,

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    oneonta al.
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    Thank you ,Txbeeguy,

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lexington, KY, USA
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    Hello txbeeguy et al,
    I have used boiled linseed oil on the slatted racks and the inner covers just as a trial. After a year they still look brand new. Using it on the frames is a novel idea and I will try it. Just a word of warning, only use "boiled" linseed oil, anything else could be toxic, and, yes, let it dry very well before using.

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