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Thread: checkmite

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Springfield New Jersey
    Posts
    119

    Post

    I don't have the package from the checkmite and want to know how long it is kept in the hive. Is it the same as Apistan around 40-45 days?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Clayton Indiana
    Posts
    348

    Post

    To control varroa mite, use one strip for each five combs of bees in each
    brood chamber (Langstroth deep frames or equivalent in other sizes). Hang the
    strips within two combs of the edge of the bee cluster. If two deep supers
    are used for the brood nest, hang CheckMite+ Strips in alternate corners of
    the cluster, in the top and bottom super. Remove honey supers before
    application of CheckMite+ Strips and do not replace until the end of the
    control period. Treat all infested colonies within the yard. The treatment
    is most effective when brood rearing is lowest. Effective control may be
    achieved by treating hives in the spring before the first honey flow and in
    the fall after the last honey flow. Leave the strips in the hive for at least
    42 days (six weeks). Do not leave strips in hive for more than 45 days. Do
    not treat more than twice a year for varroa mites.

    Source
    http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/regulati...-s18-3-99.html
    Todd Zeiner

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Check mites : the mites have become resistant to them they No longer work

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Post

    I've never used Check mite, but around here it's the Apistan that no longer works and the Check mite is still reported to be working... so far.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,019

    Post

    It seems that organo-phosphates are particularly persistent in beeswax. Is there not a danger that it will accumulate over time and potentially reach levels toxic to people handling the wax, or burning it in candles? And could it not find its way into honey via the wax being recycled as foundation?
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > It seems that organo-phosphates are particularly
    > persistent in beeswax.

    Yes. Also persistent in the human who handles
    the organophosphates, but at least the "proper
    gloves" issue has been well-promoted to
    protect the beekeeper.

    > Is there not a danger that it will accumulate
    > over time and potentially reach levels toxic to
    > people handling the wax,

    It does not need to accumulate in wax to become
    toxic to humans. Even exposure to tiny "trace
    level" amounts will bio-accumulate over time in
    the human body, and the cumulative effects are
    nasty - your neurological wiring harness goes
    haywire. This is why organophosphates are
    being phased out of all segments of agriculture
    (except, apparently, beekeeping) - the risk to
    the pesticide applicator is unacceptable to the
    US EPA.

    The question of how to handle combs that have
    been treated with Check-Mite (versus how to
    handle the Check-Mite strips themselves) has
    not been addressed in light of the realization
    that the pesticide accumulates in wax. My view
    is that this is a problem that will result in
    egg development problems for the bees serious
    enough to force one to scrap the combs long before
    it results in a detectable problem for the
    beekeeper, but on the other hand, there are some
    who simply don't recycle their brood comb, and
    could end up with combs exposed to 10 years of
    Check-Mite treatments.

    > or burning it in candles?

    The actual amount of beeswax in most of the
    candles sold by the big companies is zero.
    Even the fancy hand-decorated candles used for
    religious purposes need only contain 51% beeswax.
    I'm not sure what the combustion products from
    burning beeswax contaminated with coumophos would
    be - it is a messy little chemistry problem.
    That said, your point is very well-taken.

    > And could it not find its way into honey via
    > the wax being recycled as foundation?

    Nope, not unless the folks making the foundation
    are absolute idiots. Clearly, they don't want
    any contaminated wax, and this means that they
    are buying wax from places where pesticides are
    not used to use in making foundation, and selling
    the wax "traded in" by beekeepers out the back
    door for non-foundation applications.

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