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  1. #1
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    Seems there is a new class of bio-miticide synthesised from sugar and vegetable oil.EPA approved it for varroa treatment. http://216.239.57.100/custom?q=cache...hl=en&ie=UTF-8
    --Mike

    [This message has been edited by loggermike (edited June 23, 2003).]

  2. #2
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    The fish oil reference intrigues me because it probably works because of the same priciples of the emoulsion cords in FGMO. The bees try to tear up the rags and get oil on the mites which suffocates the mites. Of course they are quoting it to show how ridicules some cures are. My bet is it works, at least some, but FGMO will smell better.

    The other one sounds like an improvement over cumaphos and Apistan.


  3. #3
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    There probably isnt a market for honey that smells like sardines anyway.
    I havent been able to find out what effect this new stuff has on bees and brood.Probably still in the testing stage.Just something else to keep in mind.
    Also the spoof about fish oil sounded like it was directed at FGMO!

    [This message has been edited by loggermike (edited June 24, 2003).]

  4. #4
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    ACTIVE INGREDIENT
    Sucrose Octanoate Esters (a-D-Glucopyranosyl - ß-D-fructofuranosyl - octanoate). Based on sugars and vegetable oil fatty acids.

    It’s nothing new, only a different natural acid like formic acid, lactic acid or oxalic acid; there is no smell in the hive.
    I wonder how much the treatment per hive will cost, for sure not 2 cent like the oxalic acid.

  5. #5
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    I bet you are right about the price.No one can patent oxalic and charge a big price .
    --Mike

  6. #6
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    Bob Harrison wrote on the BEE-L list that Dadant plans to market the new product next year.Tests are being done now but it seems to kill 100% of varroa when applied properly.No brood or queen damage reported,no residues as it breaks down quickly.It is supposed to be low cost also .The big problem is still finding a cost effective way to apply on a large scale,though some genius(you!) will surely figure it out.(I have some dim bulb ideas of my own)
    --Mike

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    This is the stuff that will hopefully make carrying a fogger and other procedures obsolete.
    If it is 100%, that means that total elimination of mites can be achieved in areas. And then can be used on a as needed basis if hot spot are identified.
    I can't even put into words my excitement.


    [This message has been edited by BjornBee (edited June 26, 2003).]

  8. #8
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    I don't know how many of you ever used DDT, but it killed 100% of the flies you sprayed. It really did! You spray the permethrin or whatever it is now and I don't even see a dent in the number of flies. You'll notice, though, that killing 100% of the flies you sprayed did not really have any long term effect on the fly population.

    Not that I would complain if I could kill 100% of my mites!

  9. #9
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    Some more info: http://www.pestlaw.com/x/press/2002/AVA-20021001A.html
    I like the lack of residues,but the same is true of oxalic acid.One could alternate between them and cut out the use of Checkmite and Apistan,both of which saved thousands of hives ,but its time to move on.

  10. #10
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    May 2003
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    michigan
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    I'm ready for any alternatives to fluvalinate and coumaphos. Just hope someone comes up with a way to effectively apply it to numerous colonies.

    Right now I see formic as the only alternative to the two, not that the others (mineral oil, oxalic acid) won't or don't work. Its funny how we go in a circle....formic was what everyone started treating bees with, then it disappeared.

  11. #11
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    Dec 2002
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    Hallo WineMan

    “”””Its funny how we go in a circle....formic was what everyone started treating bees with, then it disappeared.”””

    Do you know why… formic acid is not bad when applied the right time and temperature. On a really hot day the acid evaporates too fast and kills bees and the queen, if it’s to cold there is not enough acid to even kill the mites.

    You can apply the oxalic acid fog almost every time the year, in the brood free time it kills close to 100% of the mites. There are many websites about vaporizing oxalic acid and you will find the answers for your questions.

  12. #12
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    I bought some of the new "Oxamite" strips from Canada. I think I found out about them on this site. Has anyone actually used them yet? No fogger ... you just put a strip or 2 in the hive for 5 weeks, then remove it bag it, and save for reuse. $11 or so for 44 strips. I'm wondering about the temperature needs.

    dickm

  13. #13
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    May 2003
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    michigan
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    hi dickm

    I too am curious about the new strips but havent yet tried them. Sure hope they work....sounds promising and easy enough to use. However, I never hold my breath about any "new treatments" until I have actually experimented with them to see if they work for me. Keep us posted on how it works.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    We have the strip here too. As I find out the strips killing only the mites outside the cells because oxalic acid dos not penetrate the wax.
    I hope the bees shredding the strips to come in contact with the stuff. They’re a similar strips coming from Austria and made from sawdust. The bees cover most of the strips with propolis instead shredding.
    I will use the strips to stop the re infection during the late summer and fog with oxalic acid a few times when they have less or no brood like I worked last year. The last year fogging result was not bad because I found the first mites on the sticky board not before the end of May.
    I got a call few weeks ago for a swarm and I vaporized the bees two times 4 days apart, lots of mites on the board the first and a few the second time. After another day I made a test with Perizin (Chumaphos) and there was nothing left.


  15. #15
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    May 2002
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    Does the fog (oxalic) penetrate the wax? Does anything? I guess the reason they say put the strips in 5 weeks is to get all the mites as they hatch.

    Dickm

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