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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    128

    Post

    I think we are talking about different trees. I am speaking of the Southern Magnolia Tree. The state tree and flower of Mississippi. On MSU's web site that lists trees and plants in MS that bees either get pollen or nectar from the Southern Magnolia nor any other Magnolia Tree is listed. Does anyone have a reference that says otherwise. Magnolia grandiflora is the exact tree I am speaking of. Here is a website with info and pictures http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek030601.html

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

    Post

    I'd shy away from the golden rain tree and the tallow tree, both can be VERY invasive.
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    Hi Cochran,
    I have to clarify, that honeybees will forage the Magnolias for the abundant pollen, but they are not nectar producers except for Tulip Tree.

    Malcom Sanford lists suthern Magnola along with tulip tree as 'florida bee botany' that's all I can find.

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/AA/AA08800.pdf.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    collinsville,ms,usa
    Posts
    111

    Post

    hi all , my brother-in-law lives near a large subdividsion and is full of crape myrtles trees/ bushs some are 8ft tall. the bees are all over them .so many it scares some of the neigbors. this sub dividsion is out in the county and most people are use to seeing bees.
    http//www.DeansHoney.notlong.com[/url]

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    128

    Post

    Naturebee

    Thanks for the reference.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Anyone by chance have any golden raintree seeds (or small trees would bee better) they'll part with? May show up in garden centers locally later but none right now. I'd like to try some; don't know about shipping the little trees but can pick up little trees in central or north TX probably. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Lew in Waco

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Lew,

    the beekeeping class I took last winter recomended golden rain tree. here's some info

    http://www.drobbins.net/bee's/bees1.jpg
    http://www.drobbins.net/bee's/bees2.jpg

    Someone here mentioned they are very invasive so think twice about where you plant them.
    The city plants em around here for ornamentals
    If you don't find any remind me this fall and I'll send you some seeds. I think it's to early to collect seeds now.

    Dave

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Thanks Dave!

    Lew

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    I'll have to do some looking up, but there was great interest in a tree called a Bee Bee Tree. One of the contributors in Bee Culture would send seeds to anyone who would furnish him with a self-stamped-addressed-envelope.
    I remember Richard Taylor would kind of do the same thing with a tree that grew around his house. In Richard's case, I think they were seedlings.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    these people sell the golden raintree, im going to check them out. $25.00 for 1 and $21.21 for 4 or more

    this one can't send to my zone until next spring :mad: http://www.naturehills.com/new/produ...&user=sschulze

    here's 6 vendor's that sale's this type tree and 1 that sale's SEED's

    http://davesgarden.com/ps/go/1778/
    Ted

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    $25.00
    OUCH!!
    There are a lot of em around here
    I've never gathered seeds, but I assume it would be easy.
    I'll get some a bit later in the year and if anybody wants some I'll be glad to send em.
    I've never had much luck sending seedlings thru the mail

    you guy's keep in mind, Branman mentioned that these things are pretty invasive so think about where you're gonna plant em
    they shoot off runners from the root and unless you mow under em you'll end up with a grove of em

    Dave

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    49

    Post

    Regarding Golden Rain Trees. I have watched these trees in front of church for several years. They bloom in late July for 2-3 weeks and the bees love them. I have seen no signs of them coming up from roots the way aspen and many other trees sucker, but hey do sprout seedlings from the numerous seeds produced each year. I gathered seeds one year and spread them in an area of my yard and quite a few came up. I am thinking this is why they are considered invasive, the same as Russian olive trees are because of how well the seeds germinate. I am certain it will be several years before the trees would be mature enough to bloom. The seeds-seedlings in my yard ended up being removed with all of my garden for an addition on my home so I don't know how many years they would take to bloom (they were 2 years old) I decided to purchase a tree from the nursery so
    that I could have the blooms sooner. I bought it in June and it is currently in bloom.
    Tom Patterson<br />Aurora, CO

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
    528

    Post

    Hey Tom

    If you find them locally are they as expensive as "on the net"?

    I've been offered one from about 150 miles away; in a gallon container. No idea what the shipping will be or how you ship a container planted tree.

    Lew

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Post

    Tulip Polar honey is great. The tree grows fast and gets huge. The Poplars around here bloomed beautifully this year, 100 feet up and made some fine dark honey. It could be marketed as "real old time Tulip Poplar honey" setting it apart from the lite clover honey that is common.

    Suburbanites probably fear its size. Another reason to plant them in town!

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    drobbins, if you get some seeds, put me on your list, I would like to try to grow some.
    Ted

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Drobbins,
    If you gather seeds, I'll send an SASE for some seeds.

    One tree I haven't seen on the list is Autumn Olive. It is a heavy nectar producer in the early spring.

    Honey Locust is another tree that my bees love. Not all trees bloom every year. I can tell which ones have by the number of pods hanging on them later on. According to the books, they aren't useful as a nectar source. My experience with them says otherwise.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    I also think that tulip tree are an excellent nectar source. Certain maples also seem to make really early spring nectar and pollen. I'm not sure if you should "plant" it, but goldenrod makes fantastis amounts of honey in PA.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    49

    Post

    Lew,

    I purchased a tree in a 10 gallon pot that was about 12 feet tall. Cost- $109.00. That's right more than 100 dollars. My mother sent me some money for my birthday and said tell me what you spend it on, and get something you really want, so I bought a golden rain tree that is supposed to replace a Apsen that is almost dead and id over 30 feet tall. The golden rain tree was in several of the Denver area nurseries and this one was the most tree for the best price. Another nursery had trees in 5 gallon pots that were about half the height for about half the price. Years ago one of my over 50 friends told me (then under 50) he wasn't going to buy small trees and wait 5-10 years for them to get to an appreciable size. Somehow the few years between then and now have brought me to reach some his same conclusions.
    Tom Patterson<br />Aurora, CO

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    49

    Post

    Lew and all,

    I also would be willing to send some of the seeds from the golden rain tree to interested people if the send me a self addressed, Stamped envlope. Seeds are available in the fall. 975 South Rifle Street. Zipcode is 80017-3212
    Tom Patterson<br />Aurora, CO

  20. #40
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Tom,

    sounds like you have some experience with these
    I figured since they bloom in july the seed wouldn't be ready to collect till fall.
    Have you ever collected seeds before?

    Dave

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