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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    I suspect this thread might sink like a lead balloon, but here goes nutt’en ,,,
    Would enjoy hearing suggestions.

    I’m compiling a fact sheet that would appeal to the homeowner, that folks can use for selecting trees and for planting in their back yards that are known for their beauty, shape and shade. But must also be beneficial to wildlife and honeybees.

    Also interested in compiling a list of shrubs known for their ornamental beauty that also provide for the honeybees and wildlife.

    If you participate with suggestions of trees and shrubs, I will be sure to send you the complete list when I am finished researching, that you can print out to provide to your customers. But this will take some time, but I will fulfil the promise.

    For example, So far I have:

    Black Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica)
    Also known as, blackgum; sourgum, pepperidge, tupelo, and tupelo gum. An excellent ornamental tree, pyramid shape growth, rarely attacked by pests, flowers in the summer and is visited by honeybees, and provides a cherry sized fruit for larger birds such as bluebirds and robins. Grows to 80 feet, beautiful bright fall color.

    American Basswood (Tiliaceae tillia Americana)
    Also known as whitewood, linden and bee-tree. A beautiful stately tree with a tall, straight trunk and rounded crown. Due to the deep, extensive root system, it is wind firm. Blooms in early summer and is visited by honeybees. The fruit ripens in late fall but sometimes remains on the tree into the winter and are eaten by Birds, squirrels and chipmunks. Grows 60 to 100 feet

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    lilacs: Syringa vulgaris

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    A french guy living in Chester, UK
    Posts
    133

    Post

    You can try:
    (big trees)
    - Tilia Cordata (lime tree)
    - Sweet chestnut (castane sativa)
    - Robinia pseudo acacia (false acacia)
    - Willow (for the valuable pollen they provide in the spring )

    (smaller trees)
    - Cherry tree (the tree giving the cherry fruit)
    - Plum trees
    - pear trees

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    The Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    297

    Post

    How about:

    (smaller up to 60')
    Sourwood - Oxydendrum arboreum

    (bigger to 70')
    Catalpa - Catalpa speciosa zone 4-8

    (really big over 100')
    Tulip Poplar - Liriodendron tulipifera

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Abelia, Beautiful shrub with millions of flowers, very long blooming period
    Don't know latin name

    crepe myrtle

    magnolia

    blueberry

    red tip

    http://www.ncbeekeepers.org/plants.htm

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Black Locust

  7. #7

    Post

    Red bud.
    Various fruit trees.
    Crabapple
    Tupelo
    Maple
    Oak
    Elm
    BEE-L snob since 1999
    What's a swarm in April worth?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    a good tree that blooms early and give the bee's a good source of pollin and nector for a fast build up is Bradford pairs tree's, my bee's love them.
    Ted

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    193

    Post

    Pata de vaca - Cows hoof(Bauhinea variegata)

    A beautiful tree with leaves shaped like a cows hoof that open at dawn and close at dusk, gives of a pink flower during the months of May and June in the Brazillian climate. If pruned correctly it gives a lovely shade and yes the bees like it.

    Ingá (Inga edulis)

    A tree that gives of a wonderful shade (not unlike the willow tree) with white flowers that the bees and humming birds go mad for. Also gives of a white sweet fruit that the monkeys enjoy.

    Ipê amarelo do cerrado(Tabebuia chrysotricha)

    A tree mostly found in the Minas Gerais area famous for it's beauty (last year when it came into bloom it got a slot on the evening news) gives of a yellow flower.

    Ipê branco (Tabebuia roseo-alba)

    Same as above but with a white flower.


    I've re-edited the post because first time round I didn't give details,,,,my apoligies.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    In the class I took they pushes Golden Rain Tree because it bloom during our summer dearth

    http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopE...ees/golden.htm

    It's quite pretty too

    Dave

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Siberian Pea Bush...... The bees just go nuts over it!! Early bloom.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    drobbins....... What zone's do the Golden Rain Tree survive?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Sundance,

    http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1778/

    looks like they'll grow anywhere my toes could survive and some places they couldn't
    The city plants em around here as ornamentals, it's a pretty tree.
    This fall I'm gonna go around and dig up seedlings from under established trees

    Dave

    PS: ouch, I just looked at the USDA zone map
    you must have thicker socks than I do [img]smile.gif[/img]

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    American Chestnut

    http://www.acf.org/
    Rob Koss

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    144

    Post

    I just planted 36 of these along the creek.

    "BUTTONBUSH
    Cephalanthus occidentalis
    Spreading shrub to 10' tall
    Sun to part shade
    Wet to moist soils - bordering streams, ponds, ditches
    Flowers are insect nectar source
    Waterfowl eat seeds
    Many medicinal uses and uses in folk remedies, such as relieving malaria and fever
    Leaves can cause poisoning in grazing animals "

    Pussy willow is also supposed to be a good source of early spring pollen.

    Diane W

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    128

    Post

    iddee
    I didnt think the bees worked magnolia?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >I didnt think the bees worked magnolia?

    I saw some working it just last week. They also like Jap Arbor tree and trumpet vine. Lambs ear is a good flower plant too.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    You might check this thread out. Awful lot of info here.

    http://www.beesource.com/cgi-bin/ubb...=000500#000000
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Plano, North Texas
    Posts
    318

    Post

    Chinese Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum)
    Description: An excellent shade tree. The Chinese tallow is a fast-growing deciduous tree with a rounded or conical crown and an open, airy look. In fall the leaves turn brilliant shades of scarlet, orange, yellow and maroon.
    Honeybees make a desirable light-colored honey from the flowers. The plentiful fruits provide food for many species of birds, ground squirrels and other smaller animals.
    "Before I speak, I have something I'd like to say. . . . I will try to keep this short as long as I can." Yogi Berra

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    Great tree references! Thanks everyone!

    cochran500,
    Bees will forage Magnolias. Many don't relize, one of the most famous honey plants in the USA is a Magnolia. It is called 'Tulip Tree' or 'Yellow Popular'
    Best Wishes,

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