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  1. #1

    Post

    In “general” are state inspections a requirement of or dealing with some law for beekeeping or is this something done at the beekeepers request?

    When and for what reasons would you call the state inspector to inspect your hives?

    Thanks for the information.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    CFF

    I think most regultions vary by state
    check here

    http://www.ncagr.com/plantind/plant/apiary/apiary.htm

    for NC

    BTW, our local inspector in Wake County is a great guy
    very happy to come out to my place and give advice to a rookie
    and free [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Post

    >In “general” are state inspections a requirement of or dealing with some law for beekeeping or is this something done at the beekeepers request?

    That depends on the State. Some states require you to register and the state inspects at their discretion. Some states don't require registration and don't require inspections. Some require registration but only inspect if you ask. In Nebraska, you don't have to register and I can only get an inspection because I'm selling bees and only at my request and only if I pay for it. $200 last year.

    >When and for what reasons would you call the state inspector to inspect your hives?

    If you are required to have the inspection to take them to another state or to sell them or if your state requires it or if you suspect you have a problem and want an expert opinion.

    But the problem is that many states also have requirements for how to deal with those problems and once you have an inspector you are stuck with their solution. You also have the problem that some inspectors aren't that knowledgable either (many are, but some aren't) and they may burn your hives for American Foulbrood (AFB) when you only have para-foulbrood or European Foulbrood (EHB) or even chilled brood. So I would be more inclined to get a test kit or send a sample to the Beltsville lab first. Then you'll have a definitive answer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4

    Post

    Your taxes pay for it in NC. Call them any time you want. I've called them twice. First was to inspect some long abandoned hives that someone suggested would have some naturally selected resistance. The second was because I had some hives dying without my understanding why. Bad beekeeper, they were starving.

    I'd make a point of going to some meetings where the state inspectors talk.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    Like others have pointed out, the regulations vary by state. In Kansas, the state doesn't care what you do with your bees. Now that I'm back home in South Dakota, the state has the power to check my bees whenever they feel like it.

    I would make use of your inspectors whenever you have questions if you don't have to pay an additional fee, or try to make some judgements about when the information might be worth the fee. Don't always assume that an inspector knows more than you do, though; states try to hire qualified people, but some of the people in the field are there for the job/money more than for providing a service. I had one inspector show up, in the rain, wanting to open two hives that I had started from packages less than two weeks before he arrived. I had to have certificates of health on the packages (also a South Dakota requirement to receive bees from out of state), and I managed to convince him to wait until a sunny, warmer day. He didn't see any problem with rain or cool weather and new colonies.

  6. #6

    Post

    Jon”
    You just opened up my second question, if the state has the power to inspect your hives anytime they please (are you sure you own the hives?) It sounds as if the state has more ownership than you do.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    Carolina-Family-Farm,

    The state does maintain a lot of power in South Dakota, but it some huge advantages over a lack of regulation, too.

    In SD, hives and beeyards must be registered with the state. The owners of unregistered hives face some stiff penalties if they're caught. Any bees brought in from other states, including new queens shipped through the mail, must have a certificate of health from the originating state's bee inspection service. And, SD conducts periodic checks of hives in the state to monitor diseases and parasites.

    So, why is it good? Well, SD is a huge honey-production state, but the commercial keepers mostly ship the bees out of the state for the winter. SD has a lot of bees entering and leaving the state, and the potential for disease transmission is pretty tremendous. The state also creates and distributes maps of the beeyards across the state. Say, for example, that you wanted to establish a beeyard, but you wanted to maintain a radius away from other hives to prevent contact between bees (think isolated matings, or preventing disease/parasite spread), you can pinpoint areas on the map before checking the area from the ground. From personal experience, I've found that spread of Varroa into previously Varroa-free hives is much more likely in a state without regulation (Kansas) than in a state with regulation (SD). The climate probably has something to do with it, too.

    Overall, the regulation limits the numbers of people who set up a few hives, then ignore them and let them become sources of problems for other people. If one of by "bee neighbors" has a problem, the state might be able to identify it before the owner of the bees could, and the state will notify the owner and help correct the problem as early as possible.

    In my experience here in SD, the inspectors really don't interfere with beekeepers, unless the state receives complaints from other beekeepers or the general public. For someone starting out with a few hives, the inspectors can give them a lot of advice and help identify problems before problems become overwhelming.

    I did't want to give them impression that state inspectors don't know what they're doing, just emphasize that you should scrutinize information before completely accepting it. That goes for all information, not just in beekeeping: if it can't stand up to questions, it's worthless. The advice of another should fit with what you already know, too, before you take it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    Alabama requires you to register. As a hobbiest, I didn't find the $2 per 12 hives too excessive, especially since he showed up anytime I called. And I did call my first year. You've undoubtedly read all the posts that show up during the end of summer where new beekeepers are worried about that strange smell in the hive that turns out to be goldenrod. Well, I was one of those. and the apiarist showed up quick to assure me. Nothing less would have pleased me.

    It is the license fee that pays for the program. I like that my money gets the same quick and dedicated response that the bigger timers get.

    He also is required to inspect all apiaries (I think) through out the year. So he has a tight schedule. I didn't mind when I came home to a note that he had been by and checked the hives. But then again, I have to admit that I'm a serious property-rights advocate. And as government is getting bigger and bigger, yeah, that worries me.

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Wetumpka ,Alabama
    Posts
    510

    Post

    Hey Waya,how did you get in touch with him?I was told the state of Alabama has two inspectors for the whole state.Every time I call I get an answering machine,I leave a message and never get a reply back from him..Have been registered for two years now,even as a breeder but never have been inspected.Would have liked them to have came out and looked at all these SHB this past summer and given me some support as how to kill em but could never get in touch with them..

    Maybe next year..
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    CFF, you need to call Don and talk to him. He is your local, on site, Michael Bush. He will look through your hives that you want looked at and skip the ones you want skipped. He will answer any questions you have, and re-answer them if you don't understand him the first time. Once you have met him, you will do as I do and call him every year to come out, and a call between to answer questions you have over the phone.
    You will never find a better friend when it comes to help with your bees.

  11. #11

    Post

    Registering your apiary (in my humble opinion) is saying goodbye to your property rights. The bees no longer belong to you, they belong to the states apiary. They own them because they control them. You are the states beekeeper caring for the states bees.

    The web page pointed out by Dorbbings spells it out plainly in there mission statement.

    &gt;&gt;&gt;The mission of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Apiary Program is to promote and (protect the state's beekeeping industry). The Apiary Program provides disease and disorder inspections and fumigation services in an effort to control diseases and pests of the beekeeping industry. Additionally, the Apiary Program provides educational workshops to educate the (state's beekeepers)&gt;&gt;&gt;

    In years past this I wouldn't have thought much about this but just today I was reading about (NAIS) National Animal Identification System. I'm sure your thinking this wont affect you but your wrong.

    If you have one chicken, one horse, one cow, one sheep, one goat, one bison, one liama, one alpaca, one turkey, one duck or a million of each -- you (MUST) register premises and animals with the nice government men who will control what you do with animals you used to own.

    The NAIS schedule fixes January 2008 as the date of (MANDATORY) enforcement.
    Just for clarification mandatory means "forced" enforcement means "putting into force" - (not of your own free will) The government will fine you, put you into jail or seize the animals the state now owns if they haven't been registered with the government.

    You can read about the NAIS plan at www.usda.gov/nais click on "Draft Strategic Plan" on the upper right hand side of the page.

    Dr.Mary Zanoni "The executive director of Farm for Life states that the department does (not) plan to issue "alerts" to inform livestock owners of the requirements until April 2007, only eight months prior to the date when it will be mandatory to submit the "GPS" coordinates of one's home and the "RFID" of one's animals to the USDA database.

    "RFID"= "Radio Frequency Identification"

    I am totally opposed to giving away my property rights. If I lose the court battle someday and government forces me to register my animals or my bees yawl can come by and pick up a lot of free government stuff that I used to own.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    So what? You don't own your home. Property taxes

    You don't own your car. Registration and tags, property taxes

    You don't own nor control your children Mandatory schooling

    You don't own your dog. Rabies shots and dog tags.

    You don't even own the pocket knife in your pocket. Go into an airport and see.

    So tell me, what do you think you really own.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    At the rate the gov is wasting money they will be totally broke before they can implement this program.I wouldnt worry about it.

  14. #14

    Post

    iddee
    shb and mites...I think those we get to keep... yeah definitly mites and shb.

  15. #15

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    iddee"
    Your very "very" close to correct"
    (You did miss a few.)
    I can own my labor and I have the right to contact, I can also contract my labor away to someone else. We can all contract our rights away with license, registration and permits for privileges granted by government.

    I don't have all the answers but I'm sure searching for them.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    King,
    Seems like the first time, I went through his son who goes to church with a family member. Since then, I used his email.

    His business card, which is in front of me lacks that info, and I just searched through all my archived emails for you. But here is what it does have:
    John Mynard
    P.O. Box 3336
    Montgomery, AL 36109-0336
    H. 256-593-4734
    W. 334-240-7225

    Good luck,
    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  17. #17

    Post

    My hives have never been inspected without my request. I think larger NC beekeepers would agree.

    Registering your hives seems to only have one intended consequence: notification prior to an aerial spraying of something dangerous to bees. This is because of my rights, not a loss of them.

    Who cares if the "state" has a right to inpsect my hives. I'll either get help or put out of business for something I should not be doing. If you are doing something unsafe or illegal you would have more to be paranoid about.

    How does registering your yard(s) makes the bees belong to the state? Considering that you have not registered, how do you know that they control them? You are the one going out to the hives, you have control. You experience the profit and the loss based upon how good you and the environment are to them. In fact, if you sell your honey out of the house or to stores, you do not have to pay taxes here in NC.

    Sounds like too much paranoia.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pikeville North Carolina
    Posts
    397

    Post

    I totally agree with nursebee, I have had the inspector out twice to my house once was for a SHB problem I needed advice on and another was because I left my hat in his truck. I asked almost the same questions as you do and his reply in short was " North Carolina wants more beekeepers and we are doing what we need to encourage it". He said call or email with any questions and he would be glad to help. I dont think we as NC beeks have any problems with inspectors, unless as nursebee says,

    "If you are doing something unsafe or illegal you would have more to be paranoid about."

    I think you will find they are an asset.

    [size="1"][ December 10, 2005, 06:40 AM: Message edited by: Rob-bee ][/size]
    An empty wagon rattles the loudest.

  19. #19

    Post

    Wayacoyote
    I think John only handles the northern part of the state. KBA falls into the other insp. area but I'm shure he can point KBA in right direction.

  20. #20

    Post

    In CT, if you do not register your hives, its a $5 fine. Registration is free, and you get free inspections if you have a problem.
    "To bee or not to bee"

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