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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Gilroy, CA
    Posts
    206

    Question

    Isnt there a verse in the bible that goes like "Love Thy Neighbor"? well I cant even apply it to my situation, But she hates my bees as much as she hates me+her husband. So I was curious where I should start to find some information on how many hives I can keep on my land and stay within local ordinances so that I wont get in trouble.

    Thanks a lot
    Danny
    Happiness is something final and complete in itself, as being the aim and end of all practical activities whatever .... Happiness then we define as the active exercise of the mind in conformity with perfect goodness or virtue.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,300

    Post

    Where I am, I know it is in the zoning code among other places.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Post

    You should check these couple areas:

    Check your state code.
    Check your local codes.
    Check with your state beekeeping inspector.
    Check with any local cooperative extension offices.

    You should work these down in this order so that you can read what your rights are. This way you have a basis when someone tells your their interpreation of your rights.

    State codes ususally only establish vague rules or overseeing offices.

    County or town/city codes are usually are the most restrictive (registering with state organization, limits on Hive #'s, limits on hive locations). This is normally found in your zoning office.

    Cooperative offices and state beekeepers are good because they are on your side, they want people to have bees and know their value and therefore will got-to-bat for your rights. They may also be able to give you loopholes or clauses that you can use to your advantage.

    In any case, be as absolutely polite as possible to anyone in any office you contact - you might need their help again! Remember who you talk to and remember to write down names as a reference (after you leave their office so they don't freak that you're holding them to their word). Ask if they know of anyone or office that might have further information, most people will help unless they feel that their office is the last and most authorative on subject and that you are second guessing them.

    I think that some people on the board will give you advice to move your hives elsewhere and leave emptie hives in their place to trick her - I don't playing games gains you any ground. It wastes your time, makes people even more made and really doesn't draw any lines in the sand. You need to know your rights, be able to cite the location that states you have the right and then she'll have to go on with her marry life and leave you alone.

    In the mean time, you might want to consider getting insurance through a local bee club or even as a rider with your home owners insurance. Clubs have cheap rates, I think even some state clubs are free. Even a rider on your insurance should not be substantial. This is an ounce of prevention in case your neighbor gets any more "goofy" and trying to wreck your hives and she gets stung to death in the process. It also appears responsible in the instance that a police report or court trial initiates.

    I would seriously pursue knowing the local laws. Some towns require fences or property setbacks (distance to a nearby property). It would be nice to be compliant before any hostilities arise.

    As a last resort, (god I dis-like lawyers) you could contact a lawyer (use a friend, if you admit to having a lawyer as a friend) to have them write a letter directly citing the local laws, state code and any thing else that merits mentioning. This affirmation with a gentle threat that any attempt to bring litigation would result in her loss and her paying the legal fees could extinguish the problem (although consider she's mean and could have lawyer friends or even be one).

    So be in the know, be compliant, be polite, be firm.
    Don't be afraid to file a police report, often times the first to file is the person who gets the greatest respect for acknowledging authority.

    Good Luck,

    Jeff
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    CA has adopted the "Right To Farm" suite of laws
    to protect agriculture from the encroachment of
    urban/suburban development, and the outrage of
    people who want to "get out to the country", but
    expect the "county" to be some sort of Disney
    fantasy.

    You don't say if your town has specific regs
    regarding bees, but if they don't, the county
    level laws apply.

    Here's an overview:
    http://aic.ucdavis.edu/pub/briefs/brief15.pdf

    Bottom line, if you live is a subdivision, there
    IS a limit beyond which a reasonable person would
    say "that's too many hives". The trick is to never
    seem "unreasonable" or "excessive" for the amount
    of land, and/or distance to the neighbors.

    Anyone can keep "a few hives" just about anywhere.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Jim,

    The best one I heard was about urban beekeepers who disguise their hives as rooftop air conditioning units. If noboby knows knows a beehive is there....then it doesn't exist to them!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Gilroy, CA
    Posts
    206

    Post

    LOL that is pimp.
    Happiness is something final and complete in itself, as being the aim and end of all practical activities whatever .... Happiness then we define as the active exercise of the mind in conformity with perfect goodness or virtue.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    There is in interesting article in this months Bee Culture, about the hazards of being killed by any kind of stinging insect. The chances of someone in the USA dying from a sting is 1 in 5,555,555 the chances of dying from falling out of bed is 1 in 653,000. Almost makes a person want to start sleeping on the floor!
    People are afraid of what they don’t understand, and the narrow minded don’t want to learn about their fears but prefer to wallow in their ignorance, and there isn’t much you can do for them. But the majority of people are willing to listen and some will even become beekeepers.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
    Posts
    445

    Post

    I found it under the animal control ordinance, at the city website.

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