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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
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    38

    Post

    What is the lates information on the use of this fungus since November 2004?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Not good. The kill rate of the original study
    done at Weslaco could not be reproduced by
    one of the original researchers in Florida last
    summer, or in my own field trial last summer in
    the Carolinas.

    So, back to the drawing board, it appears.
    While the kill rate was "good" it was nowhere
    near what it was said to be in the published
    papers. There are a number of reasons why this
    might be, so perhaps with some effort, the fungus
    could turn out to be everything hoped for.

    But, if wishes were Porsches, we all would drive. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Thank you for the response. our bees are presently in California for the Almond pollination and we need to treat them again in April with something different as the mites are getting tough to treat with success.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Post

    Knoefler here you can find several ways with good success rates. I would recommend going for any kind of natural acids. Mites have no chance to build a resistant against these acids.
    With formic you need lots of experiences and even than it will kill some queen and brood also. An alternative way is oxalic acid, which I use with great success for several years.

    Here the links:
    http://de.geocities.com/vaporizerklaus/ http://www.biovet.ch/03_english/03_p...n/LIEBIG~1.HTM

    Oxalic acid is a German site but in English also. I work with the electric device but this one is for commercial beekeepers.
    As a formic dispenser you can use medicine drop bottles up side down on two paper towels in a plate. When using this way make sure the formic comes out of a freezer and the towels are soaked with water. The formic evaporation starts slow and its saver for bees and queen. To hold the bottles in position take a piece of board drill a hole and stick the bottle up side down in the hole.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    AXTMANN:

    Thank you for your rsponse
    Last September when we removed the crop in North Dakota we used fluvalinate mixed with vegetable shorting (2 tablespoons) we got a 95% kill but now we think we need to rotate to something else because of the resistance to the chemical.
    We have thousands of colonies to treat. We have tried formic acid and it is not very consistant in killing the mites. we need a fast way to treat the bees. It seems to me that the bees must be broodless in order to use Oxalic acid. Our bees have three or more frames of brood now and will only grow for the rest of the year.
    We need to treat by April or May latest.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Post

    Knoefler

    If the colony is brood less one OA treatment would be enough but you can treat with OA anytime the year as long as ther is no freezing temperatures.
    With brood there would be a second or third treatment necessary - 7 to 10 days apart. With pipe vaporizers you can’t treat so many hives, it would take you weeks for even the first treatment. The battery-operated vaporizer is the right one, you can connect several together and it takes sill the same time. I visited a commercial beekeeper (480 hives) here last fall; the guy works with 10 electric vaporizers together on a big battery. One treatment takes approx a minute for 10 hives that mean 100 colonies in 10 minutes. It takes longer to refill the vaporizer than it needs to evaporate the acid.
    You can figure out yourself how long it would take to treat your colonies with more vaporizers. OA is very cheap I think one treatment would cost a cent or so. The best thing is… no problem with bees or queens or the outside temperatures like you will have when using formic. Phone the manufacturer the company must be in your area?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    AXTMANN: I checked the sites you gave me and run into Oxamite strips which sounds pretty good. Why stips versus fogging. whichwouild be best. I would like for someone to tell me the Kill rate with OA.

    Do you know Adolf Determann Copmpany in Hamburg?
    Mobius is the last name of the president of the company. I forgot the first name.
    anyway when I was in Germany about 20 years ago Mr Mobius took me to a Beekeeper that had about 1,500 colonies the bees were on the heather at the time. I forgot his name also. You might know him.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Trevor Mansel: I am a new user of the forum so I lost your message cant seem to find it so I can respond privatly try again.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Clear Lake, WI / Sebring, FL
    Posts
    627

    Post

    I just wanted to know the mixture for fluvalinate and shortening. out of curiosity.
    Clear Lake Wi. / Sebring Fl.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Trevor: We mixed one bottle of Maverick in 3 gallons of shortining in a five gallon bucket with a paint paddle on a drill. We applied 2 tablespoons of the misture on the end of the hive tool when we removed the crop. It seemed to be the best treatment muchbetter than the strips you buy. We know the mites will become resistant so we need another treatment for April or May after removing the citrus honey You can get the shortining at the wholesale house in 50 #

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Clear Lake, WI / Sebring, FL
    Posts
    627

    Post

    I was just wondering , right now I mix the stuff with conola oil and spray the top bars.
    Clear Lake Wi. / Sebring Fl.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Trevor: I dont know how many bees you are trying to treat. But we think vegtable Shorting (Crisco)is best because the mixture will stay in the hive for a couple of months being released slowly. The bees do not like the grease but they rub up against it just like the strips we used before mites became resistant to them.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    Trevor: What kind of results have you had and how long have you used the stuff. I am wondering if we can get by with it another season.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    axtmann: I want to purchase some Oxamite strips but dont know how to order or where to send the payment. Please help me out.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,127

    Post

    I think you'll like the evaporator better. Search on here for "oxalic acid" and you'll find many discussion. I use a homemade one with a torch to heat it.

    Here is the commercial vaporizer:

    http://www.members.shaw.ca/orioleln/Vaporizer.htm

    Here are a couple of versions of a homemade evaporator:

    http://wind.prohosting.com/tbhguy/bee/oxal.htm


    Here are the strips:

    http://www.members.shaw.ca/orioleln/new_oxamite.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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