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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM, USA
    Posts
    54

    Post

    I've been open-feeding my hives over the last few days, because we've had exceedingly warm weather here, and I suspect my hives are low on stores to begin with.

    Feeding at a time like this, when there's no forage whatsoever, seems to cause a lot of bees to go flying around aimlessly--two of my neighbors commented on the large number of roving bees. And I've seen them too. They're just wandering around.

    I don't think this has happened when I've fed inside the hives. It seems to be when I open-feed or feed using Boardman feeders. But I don't remember exactly--it could be that any dearth feeding has had this effect.

    I wondered if others have seen this. Any idea of why they behave this way? I'm guessing they get excited about the feed and figure that there must be enormous amounts of food elsewhere too, and go out looking for it. It's a little disconcerting to me, though, to have so many errant bees visiting my bee-illiterate neighbors. I never see that during the foraging season.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Winterset IA
    Posts
    47

    Post

    Bees can be a real nuisance on warm days in the fall. They appear to me to be looking for something to rob. I see them hanging around stacks of supers and investigating buildings looking for an opening to get in. Fall is about the only time you would know there were hives around our house.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I hope my bees are flying around looking for nector, pollon and water it shows they are looking even in a darth and not being lazy and just sitting on the porch.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan
    Beekeeping sence 1964

  4. #4
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > seems to cause a lot of bees to go flying
    > around aimlessly

    To the bees, it is not aimless. To them,
    the dearth is over, and they are hedging
    their bets, looking for an alternate
    nectar source. They won't find one, but
    they will search further than usual, since
    they expect to find something ELSE blooming.

    > I don't think this has happened when
    > I've fed inside the hives.

    Perhaps it doesn't happen as much.
    I don't have any hard data, but outside
    the hive means dancing, and dancing is
    a wonderfully sloppy method of giving
    a vector and a distance to another bee,
    so (as a natural result of "error") some
    bees will be off target slightly, and
    will be not going directly to your
    single-point feeder. Plants tend to grow
    in wide areas, not in single points.

    > I wondered if others have seen this.

    It is to be expected.

    > ...figure that there must be enormous
    > amounts of food elsewhere too, and go
    > out looking for it.

    Exactly. Bees want to have multiple
    sources, so the hive can "compare" them,
    and choose the "best" at any one time of
    day.

    > It's a little disconcerting to me, though, > to have so many errant bees visiting my
    > bee-illiterate neighbors.

    If the bees become a problem, then give
    the bees what they expect - multiple
    nectar sources spread over an area,
    with slight variations in sugar content
    and "time of availability". Give them
    several smaller feeders to "find".



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    I don't know if you guys are going to believe this, but my bees are bringing in pollen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,619

    Post

    Spring and fall are always the "complaint" seasons for me as a beekeeper. Nothing I can do about it. The problem is that they are mostly complaining about wasps, and not bees!! Suprising how many people lable "bees" to every sting they get.
    Anyway my bee do pose a nusance during spring and fall, before the main spring bloom, and after the last fall flow. You can help settle the bees a bit in the spring by setting pollen out in the yard for them, and in the fall insuring the hives are content with honey/sugar stores for winter

    Ian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    My bees are also bringing in pollen. In fact, this makes every single month of the year that I've seen my bees bring in pollen... I saw it even in this last January. I just wish they had that much access to nectar...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Raymond, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    177

    Post

    Yep... mine are hauling pollen also. Flying quite a bit also during the day.... am feeding some small singles internally.... maybe should start worrying about winter stores if they keep up this activity on into Jan.... but almost everything I have had a SOLID full deep of honey over another deep box.... so that SHOULD keep them until 1st of Mar... I HOPE

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