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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Lakewood Colorado
    Posts
    60

    Post

    I forgot some stuff.
    A huge rush when I hived my first package.

    I will always remember the sense of wonderment I felt when I saw the first big orientation flight going on. 200 bees flying around the front of the hive I walked up on it happening and was freaked out. I was worried it was robbing for a few hours until I figured out what was going on.

    I was just watching a big orientation flight what a cool sound.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    I guess for me it is like slipping into another world, where the stress and fast pace of trying to survie seem to melt away. Everything just seems to slooow down, and all you see is the frame of bees and brood in front of you, and the half dozen girls headbanging you. The elation you feel when you spot the queen as she slips through the crowd of workers. Bees are one of the few things in life that don't demand anything of you, unless it's leave us alone! Winter is the best time to catch up on reading, and equipment repairs in anticipation of the coming spring, and the bees return to the fields.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Peggjam,

    Yeah, there is definitelya certain thrill to spotting an elusive queen on a crowded frame. Its not the easiest thing to explain to non-beekeepers

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Splits and honey are the goals. I got honey. I split. Next year it might be even better. What can I learn to accomplish that? success = the progressive realization of a dream. I gave away two beehives this year. Never thought I'd say that.

    there's still hope. maybe I'll develop the mite eating bee. finding the queen is cool too.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Post

    I think alot of the enjoyment in beekeeping is how it brings our attention to nature. You observe and participate in the goings on of this incredibly intricate colony of bees. You watch generations unfold in front of you. You learn about their biology. You learn about the many plants your bees visit. I find myself noticing plants flowering that I never noticed before. You watch the weather with anticipation. You harvest and consume some of the bees food. The sweetest food there is. You go outside to check on your bees.

    You are communing with nature.

    I know it may sound hokey, but really you are.
    Matt, when you get tired of working on your bee equipment this winter, go outside and observe nature. Its much quieter, but the bees and all the other life is still out there.

    ...OHMMMMMmmmmm.........

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Sorry for posting again so soon. but I stand corrected. Mr. Wilson is right. Is the moon waxing or waning? For those of you south of the M-D line that means will it be larger or smaller tomorrow?

    If you can't answer you need to go outside.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,574

    Post

    One of my favorite parts about keeping bees is the almost instant "community" it creates with others. Seems like everyone appreciates some aspect of bees, whether it's the honey or the pollination or just the idea of someone in the middle of town keeping a couple of hives of bees in the 21st century. Ever notice how most folks are intrigued the minute they find out you keep bees? How many times has someone asked a simple beekeeping question that you knew the answer to, and then you thought to yourself "Pretty cool. I actually transferred information to someone today." Unlike many things, you can keep bees for as little as a few months and be able to help someone else with the basics of successful beekeeping. "Paying it forward" is a really nice part of this thing.

    And BTW, am I alone in NOT considering it just a hobby? It's much more than that, but I don't know the correct label.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Metairie, Louisiana
    Posts
    226

    Post

    Matt,I don't know your current situation, but you can see that you have all of our support , here on this forum.I am an exterminator with a conscience, hard to believe? I got into beekeeping in order to save them from exterminators who simply kill them. I practice live removal & get tickled inside knowing I have done something wonderful to save the lives of insects that serve an extremely valuable purpose & I relax in front of my bees, many evenings. it's kind of spiritual, magical, & euphoric all at the same time. Honey is a great bonus as well & I eat bee pollen every day. Beek out!!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Point Pleasant, PA
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Matt,
    I could go on and on, but it is late. Two years ago, just getting back into beekeeping after about 20 years, I was sitting and watching my two hives, just like you, and probably in a similar state of mind. My mother, who died last year after botched heart surgery and 6 months suffering in hospital, asked me why I was just sitting there watching the bees. I looked at her with my best puzzled expression, in total sincerity, and replied "that's what it's all about."
    On a deeper level, pretty much all that everyone else has written applies to me as well.
    By the way, events in my personal life since then have contributed to my needing a significantly increased level of therapy. I am up to about 40 colonies and feel the need for many more.
    Besides beekeeeper and chef, I am a family therapist and can only imagine how much potential apipsychotherapy holds. But the liability issue.....
    Tim
    Beat their game pads into hivetools.<br />Embrace curiousity.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    Tim:

    I really like your signature, this year I gave a beekeeping demonstration to a kindergarten class, it was very heart warming to see the expression of curiosity on there faces. Since then my six year old niece has started to help me in the bee yard. An observation hive will get the attention of the most active of 5-6 year old. That is also another joy of beekeeping passing along knowledge of what we have learned about nature.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Falconer, NY
    Posts
    206

    Post

    What do I get?

    I have gotten two operations on my back.

    I get frustrated with the weather.

    I get a hole in my pocket book.

    I get dissapointed by the post office.

    I get angry when I see the farmers and the government spraying pesticides around like little kids with squirt guns.

    I get depressed when hives die.

    I get sad when I find mites.

    But most of all I get a sence of calm. I dont know how else to say it. Its the same as everybody else said but I open a hive and I find calm.

    a couple of weekends ago, i started through the hives, before I knew it I had been there 3 hours. I only have 7 hives.

    I'm sure I got more than 30 stings, but I have no idea how many. ( I have three mean hives). Part way through I put on a vail.

    I do not have enough time to absorb all the calm I can find in the bee yard, but I look forward to the day I can. The good Lord willing and my back holds out....

    Like somebody said, its not a hobby, it may be an obsession, maybe an addiction, but if I could bottle the calm I find in the hives......

    tom

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    Tom:

    Very well said.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Post

    Last night I went out and got my veil and jacket on to pop a couple of frames back in that I had frozen because they were drones, just taking a couple of minutes.

    In that time, my 6 year old son flew into the house and got on his long pants and wanted to help. By that time I was done, and he was in tears because he wanted to help so bad.

    I felt bad to have disappointed him, but I felt wonderful that he was so interested and wanted to help that bad.

    He hasn't been able to help much so far, but that is another thing that I really look forward to (if I can make myself give up a little control of the bees....) He was somewhat placated when I told him that I would give him a hive when he can take care of it himself...

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    ScadsOBees:

    Get him a suit and let him come in the yard with you, let him call a hive his own even if you have to do most of the work. They grow up in a blink of an eye and if you squander the interest that your son has now other things my occupy his interest. And even if he seems to loose interest, later in his life that curiosity my rekindle because of the time he got to spend in the bee yard with his Dad. Some of the fondness memories if have of my Dad weren’t when we went to the fair together, it’s when we were just doing something together, like cutting wood or building something. I look around our bee association and don’t see many young people, we need to get the next generation interested.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Mine is part of therapy, I suffer from PTSD (Gulf War disabled vet) my doctor finds that I require fewer meds and suffer from less intrusive thoughts when working my bees (only can focus on them when working the hives, 20 right now).
    I enjoy the harmony in side the hive and get pleasure from them. My wife is supportive in the fact I'm more inclined to help her planting and buying flowers.
    In winter there is on going maintenance and repairs. Still have 25 shallows I need to replace the foundation in. My honey room needs to be completed, so there is enough to keep me busy.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Excellent point Michael. My Grandmother who was the personification of Mother Nature and my mentor was often asked, "What is your favorite season". Her response, "Right Now!" Every season has great magic and wonders if you take the time to get out and live it!

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Some of us make an actual (gasp!) profit at it.

    Sure, there are many intangibles too, but
    nothing beats those deposit slips as a
    way to relieve the aches and pains.

    jim

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    943

    Post

    I didn't think profit and beekeeping could ever be used in the same sentence. Tax write off - maybe, but not profit.

    It's like the joke about the farmer who won the big multi-million dollar lottery. When asked what he was going to do with all the money, he replied "farm till it runs out."

    Actually it would be more profitable if we didn't have to buy all that tin foil to make hats to stay tuned in to the Bee-Quick operations center. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    BTW Jim, I do like your wall of shame for those products made to sound like they have honey in them but don't. I assume you won't mind if I post a link to it here. I did not see Honey Baked Ham on the list. I had heard (no proof) that it is made with no honey at all.

    http://www.bee-quick.com/wall/shame2.html

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Rockville, Maryland
    Posts
    52

    Post

    I wanted to thank everyone for thier responses. It seems that most of us derive some level of calmness and peace when we are with our girls. I really didn't know so many people felt that way.

    I also wanted to let you know that I'm doing better. Things are still tough, but I'm seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you all for your kind words. Depression is horrible, but when you get receive the kindness I recieved here, it makes it just a little easier. But I suppose you don't have to have depression to be thankful that you have friends...

    Thanks again.

    Matt

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    490

    Post

    When I lived in Montana, my brother asked me to observe an old rancher as he rode over to and talked with us. We were hunting on his ranch, and my brother said that in his observation, he was as much a part of the land as were the rocks and trees. After my observation of him, I had to agree. Any type of agriculture will put you into some sort of this experience. I have always been interested in ag and worked near it in different ways for years. Beekeeping, I believe, makes (allows) one to be a part of the land, as he moves hives, cares for his "livestock" and deals with the farmers and other landowners who allow (or pay) him to put hives on his land. These interactions give me a sense of being part at the very core of the wonderful world God made for us to be part of.
    His Hive Honey Farm - Do all for His glory!

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