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Thread: Latin words

  1. #1
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    I went to high school when everyone thought latin was"dead" but then I found beekeeping and began to wish I knew a little bit about the proper enunciation(sp?) of some of the words I find,maybe you can relate too and will add some words,or are able to "fill in the blanks".
    I wonder if we can do a phonetic translation?

    Like how do you say:

    Apiary = A-pee-air-E

    Apis mellifera=

    mellifica=

    proboscis=

    So you get the idea,thanks,I've got more...
    Thanks
    Mark

  2. #2
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    I think the most common latin words with universal meaning to beekeeprs are non-compes-menti. I took french and and spanish and can spell in 2 native languages (only because they didn't have written languages) so feel free to correct my spelling.

  3. #3
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    Huh? You gotta keep it simple for me ,joel. [img]smile.gif[/img] !

    I got off for 5 minutes to put the garland up around the fireplace and started thinking that "apiary" is probably an english word
    So if you all don't mind,let's include obscure english words too.

    How 'bout;
    Acarapis=?
    Nosema=?
    Dzierzon=?

  4. #4
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    Apis mellifera= Aye pis mell a FAIR a

    Mellifica= Mell a FEE sha

    Proscis= Pro BOSS kiss

    Nosema= No SEEM a
    GeeB
    Life must be lived forward but understood backwards.

  5. #5
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    I'm afraid a lot of us read them more than say them. So I've heard a lot of variation even amoung long time beekeepers.

    Propolis would be another one. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    PROP oe liss?

    or proe POL iss?

    I've heard both. Maybe we should vote on it. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
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    I've also noticed that Scientists often don't pronouce them consistently and none of their pronunciations match what I learned in Latin class.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
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    I have enough trouble with English and Navajo words. I must have been around 12 before I figured out "Yosemite" but I could read and pronounce "Dzilthnaodithle" before that.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  8. #8

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    "Apis mellifera= Aye pis mell a FAIR a"
    This is the way I have been pronouncing it.
    I heard someone else say " apis mell if er a"
    I've kept my mouth shut ever since. :confused:

    [size="1"][ December 18, 2005, 03:44 PM: Message edited by: newbee 101 ][/size]
    "To bee or not to bee"

  9. #9
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    I guess I should have thought of that...you say toe-may-toe and I say tah-ma-toe.
    If I can vote I've been saying PRO-poe-liss.
    I worked for a guy once and he sold storm windows some,all the models were named after a different Indian tribe.
    The big seller was the Souix,or as my boss would say sue-OX...great guy.
    Anyway,I can think of some more,and I bet you can too.

  10. #10
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    Big Grin

    I agree MB....The latin I hear ain't like I was taught becoming a biologist where mispronouncing a latin name in class draws instant ridicule. Perhaps the pronunciation is determined by where you are from. As an example I throw out Pecan...Those of us located in the South will never pronounce it "Pee Can" just as those "North of the line" aren't likely to go with "Pea Caun."
    I would follow up with frankly it doesn't make much difference too me how you pronounce it....the object of speech is communication and regardless of how you pronounce propolis, apis m. etc...I understand what you mean (even if you do say it wrong) [img]smile.gif[/img]


    Happy Holidays everyone,
    David

  11. #11
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    I haven't been here for a while and saw this posting which caught my attention.
    I have studied and can speak fluently to not so fluently up to 32 different languages.
    I don't really think it is so important that we pronounce these words perfectly as long as we all understand each other when we speak them.
    In latin, the A's are all ah as in "call", the I's are all ee as in "keep", the O's are all long as in "rope", the E's are usually pronounced ay as in the word "pay". The U's are long as in "tube". The C's, depending on if you want the TRUE Latin or the Ecclesiastical pronounciation is different. The TRUE historically correct pronounciation is a K as in "hiccouph". If you want the Catholic church version, it would be a ch sound as in "itch". Another letter that varies from TRUE to Ecclesiastical is the V which should be pronounced like a w as in "wind". Therefore, Veni, vidi, vici would be pronounced: waynee, weedee, weekee.
    I hope this is beneficial.
    Jason G

  12. #12
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    Jason,that does help,so is varoa an english word?
    I have been saying vah-ROW-ah,should I say wah-ROW-ah?
    Mark

  13. #13
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    Perhap we need to study this question in the
    Lab RA tor ee! Or is it La BOR a tor ee?
    GeeB
    Life must be lived forward but understood backwards.

  14. #14
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    After reading this I need a Lo BOT oh mee (lobotomy) [img]smile.gif[/img]

  15. #15
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    You guys probably know this alreay, but just thought I'd post it 'cause its cool:

    apis = bee, as in apiary
    melli = sweetness/honey, as mellifluous
    fera = to transport, as in a ferry

  16. #16
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    Mark,
    Sometimes newly discovered creatures are named after the person who "discovered" them and the person's name is latin-ized. I don't think this is the case with the word Varroa, but it may be. In this case, the latinized name retains the sound of the pronounciation of the person's name instead of the true latin sound. That's why it really doesn't matter as long as we understand what we understand each other, right?

  17. #17

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    Apis mellifera= Aye pis mell a FAIR a

    Mellifica= Mell a FEE sha

    Proscis= Pro BOSS kiss

    Nosema= No SEEM a

    --------------------
    GeeB
    It always takes longer than it takes

    GeeB, re

    <Mellifica= Mell a FEE sha> I wonder about this sound. I have taken both Latin and Conversational Italian and the ‘c’ is usually pronounced hard as in ‘ka’ with an ‘a’, but soft with I or e…

    ca canto kanto
    ci ciao chow
    ce certo cherto

    There is a great site that gives an audio on Italian Latinate pronunciation of trees such as Magnoliaceae Liriodendron tulipifera at:


    http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro/dendrol...heet.cfm?ID=54

    Cheers DML

  18. #18
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    Spanish is the same way with the letter C making the S sound when followed by an I or an E as in the word, "gracias", but as far as I know, the C in Latin is always a hard C (k sound) without exception.
    Jason

  19. #19
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    I was taught that scientific names were properly pronounced with the 'traditional' Latin and not the 'church Latin' often used in religeous mass. This was covered well earlier, but my 2 cents is to stick to the 'hard Latin' prononciations and leave the soft letters to the priests and the Italians!

    Charles
    Frog Pond Acres - a sustainable farm<br /><a href=\"http://www.FPAcres.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.FPAcres.com</a> - come on in for a visit!

  20. #20
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    Most biological scientists and physicians speak Latin as words rather than as a historic language (unless they were raised by Jesuits). Its ironic, but far more philosophers and priests know the "language of learning".

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