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  1. #1
    Sue Karber Guest

    Question

    We have a huge bee hive in a 66' wall on the back of our gym. The gym is scheduled to be torn down starting the 13th of Sept. Are there any bee keepers that want to help us remove these bees in Oklahoma. I have two Italian Hives and these bees are very docile in the wall. I just don't know enough to remove them by myself and don't know if I can get hives here and ready in time. Can they be kept in something besides a hive until I get more hives? Sticky situation.

    We are located in Kingfisher Oklahoma and it is ground level location. The wall is 66 feet long, not tall. I do not have hives to transferr them into so if no one can come get them will try to use an old empty refrigerator until I can get some hives built.

    Sue Karber

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    The problem will be you need frames now to save the comb. I use 4 rubber bands on each frame which I have on the ends of it ahead of time. Saving the comb may not be as important if you have alot of drawn comb. Sorry I am so far away.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,894

    Post

    I have put bees in hollow logs, simple wooden boxes, styrofoam coolers. As long as there is an entrance about 1" or so in diameter for them to get in and out and ventilate the bees seem quite capable of surviving in most any container.

    The problem, of course is that they will stay better with brood comb and they will do better with as much brood comb as you can save.

    The best way to do this is a cut out. Tear off the siding, cut the brood comb to size to fit in frames and rubber band or tie them in. Throw the honey comb in a bucket with a lid to keep the bees out and just keep cutting and putting the comb in frames until they are done. Now and then you can brush the clusters of bees into the box of combs just to get them out of the way. When you're done they will most likely settle in the box.

    Hope you can get it done in time. I've been in Kingfisher. I'm trying to remember where it was, but I remember driving through it several times when I lived in Guthrie and was doing construction all over. Maybe I drove through it going to Cheyene, OK?

  4. #4
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    Kingfisher is on HWY 81 and if you turn east off 81 onto HWY 33 you go to Guthrie. I have about 50 white buckets so may try this myself. Thank you for your help. I will feed heavy this winter to ensure their survival.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,894

    Post

    Make sure they have the ability to adequately ventilate. If I used a bucket I'd do it upside down. That way you can put the lid (which is on the bottom and it won't have combs attached. You can see up into the hive then. But then it's difficult to remove the comb.

    If you put a series of 1 by 2's on for the top and then put the plastic lid on top with a brick to hold it you can then remove one bar or two to see what you are doing when you remove them from the bucket.

    If you cut or by some anbled pieces (a quarter round from the lumber yard will do) you can put one on the bottom of each 1 by 2 to make a top bar and the bees MAY make the combs all on each top bar so you can remove them like frames. Then you'd have a bucket top bar hive. I have several top bar hives and this actually works pretty well.

  6. #6
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    Thanks Micheal, I have no idea when I will find the time to do this. I guess I can string up lights and harvest these bees at night. Time is a real factor and lack of anyone with a pulse to help.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Golden, CO
    Posts
    171

    Post

    Could you leave the hive intact and take a section of the wall?

  8. #8
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    The people coming to salvage the building want them gone. That starts Sept. 13 at daybreak. Is there a safe way to leave them intack? Safe for the people salvaging the building which is 66 ft x 126 ft and 3 stories high except it is one story at the north end where the bees are located. It is a shame we did not realize they were there sooner. This is a wood clad building and they just moved right in through some cracks in the wood cladding. The building is around a 100 years old made of native pine and fir.

    I am opened to any suggestions but being an older woman have no idea of safety of structures and safety of bees. I don't want to get sued. These bees must have survived the extermination by the former owners. I asked them and they used seven dust blown into the walls and closed the holes. This building is on the back of our property and I just don't pay much attention to the back of it. The hail did not damage it so have not looked closely until recently when I saw them at an entrance. I have checked all the other building carefully. No bees.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,894

    Post

    It's probably between the studs in the wall. I suppose if you could take a saw and saw near the bottom and near the top and on the sides of each stud you might be able to remove the two studs and the sheeting on them. But my guess is unless you're a carpenter or at least have an idea how a wall is put together you probably won't get it done.

    Are there any beekeepers on here from the area who could help her out?


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Hills, CA USA
    Posts
    455

    Post

    Sue: Do some exploratory inspection on the
    wall below the opening, several feet below opening to determin size of working nest.
    Bees will go up to top of cavity and build down. Maybe bees are new to old prior terminated colony and nest is not as large as you think. If you remove sideing of wall you will know scope of nest. But it will be a messey termination if you pass on it. I hope you will be able to do the removal.
    I have done hundreds of colony removals from structurs over the years and most all have survived. It is a good feeling to be able to give a colony a new lease on life.
    Walt

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Post

    The is a small beekeeper supplier in Tulsa Carl Harrison (918) 425 2026 he would probably have some equipment on hand for sale. I work in Tulsa and would not be able to come and help but someone from the NEOBA club possible could. Mr. Harrison's wife is the president of NEOBA maybe they could recommend you to someoen that could help.

  12. #12
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    Thanks, I will have 5 hive bodies and lids by Friday. Come Saturday, my best friend and I are going to tackle it. She is no more experienced than I am but it has to be done by sunup Monday the 13th. I have made a vented bee vac. so as not to harm the bees too much and will vac. them right into a hive body. I will do my best to add their brood comb and get them off to a good start and feed heavily this winter.
    Daniel Vasicek from NM has writen me with wonderful pictures and really cool instructions on the bee vac and how to harvest plus what you all have advised. I will give it a go. I peeked in and the wall is full so they should be fine. It is so clean and smells so good, fresh. Thanks to everyone that helped.
    I still have to finish getting things done so the building can be torn down. It is amazing how 8400 square feet x 3 can get filled up, mostly not our stuff. Everyone will just have to pay storage somewhere.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockville, Maryland,U.S.A.
    Posts
    104

    Post

    Gooooo Sue ,we love new beekeepers here and you sound full of gusto and vigor ,trap them take them home, give them a hive and enjoy the honey and Welcome to the forums !

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Cool

    >> Thanks
    Did you get a hold of Carl / NEOBA?

    Daniel used to live in Tulsa and was a very alwasy very helpful.
    Take photos if you can.

  15. #15
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    No, my cousin is good with wood and also is coming to film the removal Saturday. It should be interesting. I hope he and his wife get a bee in their bonnet and will start raising bees. It would be nice to have someone to share with locally. Right now they are leary. I just don't understand how people can be so fearful of bees. I am the one allergic to stings and when I get stung just zap it with electricity and in 20 minutes am back to normal. I keep a animal stun gun near me at all times and the few times I have been stung was my own fault.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    johnston city ill usa
    Posts
    79

    Post

    Sue; How does a shock help with a sting? Ron.

    ------------------

  17. #17
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    It is a thing I used to teach to those who go overseas where bugs and snakes are a way of life but doctors are sometimes days away.

    The electrical shock turns the poison into positive protein, and actually makes you feel refreshed. I like it better than the shot in my leg....that sucker hurts and I feel bad for days. I have a deep cycle marine battery in the house with leads. Outside I use an animal stun gun that is 9 volt battery powered. For me it must be quick or my thorat sweels shut and I swell all over and since we live in the country if I was alone or without treatment I would die.
    The original findings were by the Univ. of Oklahoma I think. I am allergic to all venom of bees, spiders but even more wasps I think because they attack in mass. I have used this method for many years and it always works. It does not hurt, just a quick zap. I zap all around the bite and if bee sting I always have tweezers to pull out the stinger on me no matter where I am outside. Do not use on anyone with a pacemaker or near the eye. I did use a battery with leads under my eye once because I got tired of not seeing. I did the shot thing first though...still swelled and was sick. The swelling went away within 24 hours after I used the lighter electricity leads.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,894

    Post

    I'm not sure what technique you use with the tweezers, but I always scrape it with a knife or a fingernail. If you squeeze the venom sack (as with tweezers) you will inject more venom.

  19. #19
    Sue Karber Guest

    Post

    I was taught to use tweezers. Won't from now on. I have the 5 hive bodies ready, and some warm, reluctant bodies to film and help. The three of us should pull it off tomorrow. Thanks for all the help

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    Good luck, please let us know how it goes. Wish I lived closer to you I'd help in a New York Minute. Love to do extractions and have had (approx)a 95% survial rate on the extracted colines. Too bad you can't save the section of the wall like DonO suggested, then you could prop it up and do it at your leasure. Like MB said the brood comb is the most important, I use the rubber band and frame technique also, only I use 6 bands. The bees chew them and drag them out of the hive. Next year that comb will be my brood comb.
    One thing that I find very useful in my 'kit' is benidral if I get stung I take two and no swelling I also carry an Epi-Pen just in case.
    Once again I wish you the best of luck and today in lodge I'll pray that all goes well for you.

    ------------------
    'WHEN WE CLOSE OUR EYES WE ALL LOOK THE SAME' GWPW 03

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