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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Arnold, MD USA
    Posts
    48

    Post

    As previously noted, both types of mites are not pleasant for bees or beekeepers. But they can sure spark some great commentary. I think we can are probably agree that we are not going to totally elimitate them. We monitor levels, use IPM, and treat properly when necessary, which is what we should be doing.

    There are also laws of nature that cannot be ignored. It is not in the mite's best interest to kill every colony that it infests. To do that would be suicide for the mite. Somehow over time the mites will be less hard on the bees, or the bees will find ways to tolerate them. We may be seeing this already with the tracheal mites. Eventually, the mites will become a major nuisance, and not such a major poblem. Hopefully it is sooner and not later.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Post

    If the Russian bees are Varroa resistant I wonder why the Russians using oxalic acid.

    Kevin it’s up to you; there are two possible ways, the oil fogger or the electric oxalic acid vaporizer.

    I think both cost approx the same, with the oil fogger you have to work year around with the vaporizer only if necessary, one brood cycle (4 times 7 days apart) or one/two times when bees have no brood (fall/winter). I don’t know how much you have to pay for the oil and Thymol but the acid shouldn’t cost more than 2 cent per treatment.

    I would recommend for a beginner not to go for a propane vaporizer unless you have Styrofoam hives. With the propane heated vaporizer it’s very difficult to get the same fine fog crystals like you will get with the electric one.
    To reach the highest success rate you need the finest crystal possible. The acid evaporation with the electric one is 100%.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    >If the Russian bees are Varroa resistant I wonder why the Russians using oxalic acid.

    and amitraz and formic and things we havent even heard of here!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mineral, Virginia
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I'm sorry.

    I read this and tried to walk away

    But I must say, jfischer your assertion that Michael made an "unqualified statement" annoys me, and he returned your volley it beautifully.

    I can honestly say, 95% of what I know about bees I have learned directly from MB and his contributions here. I appreciate his perspectives and inputs, because it is easy to see they are based largely upon his own observations, from his own very large collection of hives.

    While finding documented research can be excellent, I believe one of the principles of research itself is to read of other's trials and attempt to either duplicate them ourselves, or disprove them with our own results.

    Possibly you meant nothing derogatory by your reply, and gosh knows I am horrid with written tone, but I read over it a couple of times and it certainly does read rather harsh, especially from a member in attendance over a year longer than MB, but with 99.7% less posted participation.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    "Unqualified" in that context is not referring to Michael's knowledge of bees.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Post

    >But I must say, jfischer your assertion that Michael made an "unqualified statement" annoys me, and he returned your volley it beautifully.

    Actually I think he is correct. I did not qualify it and I should have. I did shortly after he said that. But I will quote Axtman: "If the Russian bees are Varroa resistant I wonder why the Russians using oxalic acid."

    It is my opinion backed up by my experience and by all the beekeepers that I know of personally and the obvious fact that the Russians still have Varroa problems, as do beekeepers all over the world, that genetics alone is not succeeding at handling Varroa mites.

    Does anyone personally know of anyone who is succeeding with bees on large cell with no kinds of treatments whatsoever for more than two years? I don't.

    >I appreciate his perspectives and inputs, because it is easy to see they are based largely upon his own observations

    That is true. I've never been much to believe something because it was in a book when my observations led me in another direction.

    > from his own very large collection of hives.

    I don't think I qualify as having "a large collection of hives". I've only got about 40 right now. But I have had bees and experimented extensively and observed them closely for 30 years.

    Thanks for standing up for me.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Ellensburg, Washington, USA East Edges of the Cascades
    Posts
    61

    Post

    I think that with screened bottem boards and the "mite resistant" bees from R Weaver I will use a preventive mite treatment with FGMO fogging. I'll head out and buy a fogger soon, It shouldn't be hard to treat every 2 weeks as I only have 3 hives and they are on my property. Then I will fog through the bottem board. About how long do you fog each hive? Do you fog during the winter as well?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Post

    When I was fogging I did not fog in the winter.

    I will reiterate what I have said many times before.

    Monitor the mites. Whatever you decide to do. Monitor the mites. Don't blindly assume that any method is working for you. Measure it.

    I think probably most of the methods people are using are working for someone somewhere in the way they are applying it, and probably all methods fail if they are not done in the right way, the right amount at the right time.

    So if you don't monitor you won't know if it's working or not.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Ellensburg, Washington, USA East Edges of the Cascades
    Posts
    61

    Post

    Will do!
    Thanks for you help.

    Kevin

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