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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    This is nothing new but I thought I would state the obvious in case someone missed connecting the dots.
    Super with the Manley Frames and use 11 frame brood chambers to maximize brood rearing and minimize extracting chores.
    http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/foru...asp?FID=6&PN=2
    http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/foru...asp?FID=6&PN=1
    Now's the time to plan next year's management scheme.
    Jon, N6VC/5

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    I am disappointed in the response to the article I presented on the Manley Extracting frame. The only person that really read the dissertation was Sundance. He shared my surprise at the unique extraction method, too.
    http://nordykebeefarm.com/forum/foru...sp?TID=26&PN=1
    Jon, N6VC/5

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    I read the article. They are similar in some respects to several things I've seen before including DE hive frames and Killion's frames (Honey in the comb by Eugene E. Killion 1st edition page 30 figure 26. Or described as "Miller" frames on page 19 of Honey in the Comb by Carl Killion 1951 edition. I'm sure C.C. Miller has a description in 50 years among the bees, but I haven't looked that one up.

    I find the DE frames very easy to uncap because of the narrow width of the frame and lack of Hoffman spacers getting in the way of uncapping.

    But I don't have an extractor that would hold the DE boxes. [img]smile.gif[/img] Otherwise one could do that method also. What kind of extractor would it take?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Hi Michael,
    I have no idea what a DE frame or box is.
    Charlie Koover read about this frame in the July 1966 Gleanings in an article called "The Honey Super", by Dr. Francis G. Smith, Sr., Apiculturist in the Australian Department of Agriculture.
    Charlie didn't say who the large beekeeper was that used them.
    Charlie say that since he read the article, he didn't use any other frame.
    There are two things that are mentioned that are significant, the first is that frames are uncapped in the supers, too.
    It would be a neat field trip to visit and watch supers being extracted!
    Jon, N6VC/5

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    490

    Post

    As I am being overwhelmed with the info available to me for beekeeping, I find it interesting that there is still much stuff you long time beekeepers are still learning. I guess there is no end to the decisions one can make regarding equipment.
    His Hive Honey Farm - Do all for His glory!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    >It would be a neat field trip to visit and watch supers being extracted!

    It would. I wonder how they uncapped them?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Conway, AR
    Posts
    439

    Post

    Hi Michael,
    Can you imagine 18 blades vibrating as they move across the super.
    Sioux Bee is up in your neck of the woods aren't they? Maybe someone there could point us in the right direction to organize a field trip.
    I can ask Kim, too. He might remember. Charles gave Bee Culture all his material before he passed away.

    By the way, what is a DE frame?
    Jon, N6VC/5

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    A DE hive has a very narrow frame (about 15/16" wide if I remember right). The end bars are the same width and the bottom bar is about 1/2". The spacers are plastic and fit over the end of the top bar. The frames are all spaced 1 1/2" (brood supers and all). It's more similar to a British Standard than a Langstroth. The end bars are longer also. Very light weight frames. Very easy to uncap.

    http://www.beeworks.com/D.E.Details.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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