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Thread: Queen Rearing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    York, South Carolina
    Posts
    136

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    Hi:
    With the prices of Queens going higher and higher they are getting out of my budget.
    Would someone who does queen rearing consider writing a proceedure they use. It should be in very simple detial with explination on what the equiptment is and how it is used. I guess I'm saying it should be written fool proof.
    I have read many papers, books, and articles and most are in general terms,some call a piece this in his article and another will call it that in her article making it very confusing for a 3yr beekeeper.
    I know this will be time comsuming and I am will to pay for it if its not to much.
    It looks like the jenter method is the simplest but then I'm not sure.
    Please contact me if you are intrested.
    Lanfordgv@comporium.net
    Thanks so very much
    Barney

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
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    1,998

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    Hey, it can be as simple as placing a frame of eggs into a strong queenless hive or nuc. Just make sure that the previous queen hasn't layed in the 48 hours prior to dequeening or you might end up with intercaste queens being raised.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Lockport, LA 70374 also on the new map
    Posts
    46

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    Barney said he is looking for clarity to understand queen rearing.

    Aspera has an answer that is not clear? :confused:

    Aspera, IF, you know the procedure that you mention, please elaborate.

    For instance, how would you keep a queen from laying in 48 hours. Would you de-queen and hope to find 3 day old eggs after 48 hours? Lock the queen in a queen jail? Send the queen on a cruise? How?

    Barney is asking for a clear and simple explaination and so am I.

    I have also been reading extensivly and I think I understand some procedures but I really would appreciate a 1-2-3 etc steps. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Thanks
    JB

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
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    722

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    The Jenter method or system only really replaces grafting, not the rest of the process. And while grafting can be frustrating at first, it only takes a little practice to be reasonably good. The jenter system by contrast costs a lot more than a good grafting tool and a few cell cups, requires finding an catching the queen (which still is hard at times even after lots of practice), and has it's own frustrations when the queen refuses to lay. Still many use it with success and it is helpful if you have a hard time seeing egg sized larvae and don't have a reasonably steady hand.

    There are plenty of instructions out there on the web. Glenn Apiaries has a pretty strait forward set of instructions on the subject and is for the most part what I use, see: http://members.aol.com/queenb95/queenrear.html
    There are dozens of variations of this, often geared toward producing large number of queens or for producing many batches of queens.

    As Aspera says, walk away splits are another option. To avoid intercaste queens you can also inspect them in 2 days and destroy any queen cells they had started making sure to leave them with some eggs or 1 day old larvae.

    -Tim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wolfforth, TX
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    23

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    What is intercaste queens?
    I know more about nothing than you will ever know about anything.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
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    When the egg first hatches, 3 days after laying, it is fed Royal Jelly, after it is decided that the larvae is to be a worker the food quality is drastically reduced, this prevents the formation of ovaries and queen pheromones. The bees can even after this time change back to Royal Jelly, and will produce a semi-queen or intercaste, quite capable of laying eggs, but they are usually small and weak, and their egg capacity is very poor.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Clear Lake, WI / Sebring, FL
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    627

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    Check out the Ohio Queen Breeders web site.
    Clear Lake Wi. / Sebring Fl.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
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    I've tried raising queens by using a frame with very young brood (still curled in the bottom of the cell) placed in a nuc of 3 frames of bees with sealed brood. Sometimes it seems to work; sometimes not. My eyesight is such that I can seldom see eggs in the cells (I'm 63; don't see as well as I used to). Any suggestions on improving this procedure? I have some feral hives I'd like to get some queens from. BTW this is the end of my first season.

    Lew in TX

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Perkasie, PA
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    Sorry, I geuss that that answer was a bit terse. As mentioned above, you can either cage the queen for a few days or cut out ALL of the queen cells a few days after removing the old queen. Bees do just fine making their own queen with split colonies. The only reason to use queen caging or the cell removal procedure is if you want to raise daughter queens from a particular colony (ie place one of ten egg frames into ten queenless colonies to make ten queens who are all half sisters). Don't worry too much about "emergency cells" Strong colonies will choose the youngest larva and feed them lavishly.

  10. #10
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    Jul 2005
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    Lew,

    I just started using black foundation and it helps me to see eggs. Maybe a magnifier would also save your eyes?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
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    Thanx Aspera

    I'm using all small cell; black not an option that I know of for now (til some comb gets old). got a jewelers type headband mag; need to try to modify it so it'll stay in place under the veil.

    Lew

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    lew best adds:
    I've tried raising queens by using a frame with very young brood (still curled in the bottom of the cell) placed in a nuc of 3 frames of bees with sealed brood. Sometimes it seems to work; sometimes not.

    tecumseh replies:
    one of the primary rules of raising queens is that you are trying to simulate a swarming situation. so the first rule is that unless you are into a significant flow (at which time queen rearing is definitely easier) then a good deal of feeding is required to stimulate the hive. I also find that by feeding the queen mother's hive that the larvae use for grafting is easier to see and remove.

    ps from your neighbor...
    hope your season went well lew...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,142

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    Search on queen rearing here and I've given my calander and advice as have others.

    The most important things are:

    Timing. Everything has to happen at the right time or it will fail.

    LOTS of bees. You can't underestimate the importance of having the cell starter PACKED AND OVERFLOWING with bees.

    Food. Make sure there is honey and pollen in a cell starter.

    The rest are just the details of how people try to get those things.

    Here is an excellent queen rearing plan:

    http://www.ohioqueenbreeders.com/queen_rearing.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    waco, tx
    Posts
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    Thanks guys

    Maybee the food/food source available was a big factor. So dry here all summer no honey flow; all the old timers in the bee club said it was worst drought/flow they'd ever seen. Most of my honey for the winter came from removals; very little from the hives I have.

    Lew

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