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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    LaGrange, IN
    Posts
    5

    Question

    This is my first time extracting. To clean the wet supers, I have heard different opinions: *let the supers be "robbed" at various distances from the beeyards, *place the wet supers above the inner covers to be directly cleaned (One text suggested only placing five or six wet frames at a time per colony when doing this but without an explanation), *save the wet frames for initial spring feeding.
    Does anyone have any definite opinions regarding the cleaning of wet honey supers? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Post

    IMHO

    I split them up between all of my hives and put them above the inner cover. They clean them out quite quickly. Don't leave them on too long or they'll start chewing up the combs.

    If you put them out in the bee yard it tends to start a robbing trend. I haven't had that problem putting them on top. If you put them away from the beeyard, any bees, yours or not, have equal chance at them, which may be a waste of honey, but it still may induce robbing as, from the bee's point of view, they are robbing an empty hive even if it's not in your bee yard.

    I haven't tried keeping them over winter and using them for spring feeding. I'm afraid the ants would get into them and the mice would be more attracted to them, but then I haven't tried it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Medford Lakes,NJ,USA
    Posts
    94

    Cool

    Craig, I put them back on the hives. Let the bees clean them out. Wet honey supers left out can attract wax moth and serious damage. Steve

  4. #4
    Kevin S. Lunsford Guest

    Cool

    Hello Craig,
    To keep wet supers we wrap them in pallet wrap and store them in the honey house-no ants or mice ever. Wrap about 3-5 at a time. No PDB is needed. We might get wax moths on a few frames/100 supers (keep supers that may have had a little brood in them wrapped seperate). There is little honey left for food. This is used to stimulate storage, when your nectar flow starts put out every drawn super you have.
    Kevin

  5. #5

    Post

    This year is my first year. I put 10 frames above the inner cover in one of my 2 hives and the fool bees started to move in instead of clean out! I was told I should have placed an empty super above the inner cover and my frames to be cleaned in a super above that. Next year I'll try it that way. In my other hive I placed 2 frames (all I had left) and they did the job as I thought the other girls should have. Always something to learn.

  6. #6

    Post

    hello
    no is no wrong way to have bees remove the honey.
    beekeeping is a life long learning experence and if you make a mistake you learn from it.
    I have been doing this full time for 48 yrs and still learn every year.
    keep at it
    Don

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    Hello,

    This is my first message to this discussion group. I have been reading from it for a while now and have learned a lot from all you guys already. But here is another experience/question:
    This is my first year and 2 weeks ago extracted the honey from my hive. I put back the 2 supers with wet frames on top of each other and right next to the single hive I have, thinking that the closer the easier for the bees (and perhaps less robbing), and also thinking that putting them back inside would perhaps make them start using these frames again. I put them on a pair of cement blocks so that the bottom. 2 things happened:
    1) I am almost sure there was robbing galore because I saw lots of bees in there with much darker bodies than the average in my hive.
    2) I kept them there over night and the next day there was a pile of little bits of wax and dozens of dead bees below the 2 boxes with frames.

    Can anybody explain the massacre? I know a few died with their bodies stuck inside cells they were probably taking honey from (I guess they got too fat to get back out . But, why so many dead?

    Thanks

    Jorge

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Post

    Your hive and some other hive or hives were fighting over the honey. The was is sometimes just what was left stuck to the combs after you extracted, but they will eventually tear up some of the wax too. You would have been better off putting the supers on top of your hive. I'd put them on top of the inner cover, but even just on top of the hive will work. What's so bad if they fill them up again? On top of the inner cover I haven't had them do that.

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