Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: russian queens

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    833

    Sad

    ........all my hives have russian queens,but the workers are Italians......

    Rocky how can you have Italian workers from Russian queens?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    >has anyone used walter kellys russian hybred queens and if so what did you think of them

    Kelly doesn't actually raise them. I'm thinking they are from Hardemans? Don't remember for sure off the top of my head.

    They were ok. I haven't been that impressed with the Russians one way or the other yet. They did ok, but not awsome.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    Axtmann
    <Dan, can you explain why Russian beekeepers treat their hives with oxalic acid for almost 25 years?
    I personally know several beekeeper immigrants, some from the Ural Mountains in Siberia who used that acid I Russia.>

    What about the past 100 years or so that these mites lived with the bees? That was before the acid. The bees they were treating were 100% Russian or were they some other breed they were trying out? Take a look at these WEBB sites.
    http://members.aol.com/queenb95/russ...l#anchor797530
    http://www.russianbreeder.com/
    http://msa.ars.usda.gov/la/btn/hbb/Coop/coop.htm

    There are more sites but I think this is enough for now.

    Dan


    [This message has been edited by bjerm2 (edited September 08, 2004).]

    [This message has been edited by bjerm2 (edited September 08, 2004).]

  4. #24
    rocky ridge bees Guest

    Post

    got my bees from commercial bee keeper. purchased nucs he made from his stock.theres a guy in forest m.s. raises russian queens .

  5. #25
    rocky ridge bees Guest

    Wink

    oh yea , i quess they are bi raceel bees now

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    833

    Lightbulb

    @ bjerm2 / Dan

    The Varroa mites arrived in Europe in 1976/77 when nice scientists bought Apis cerana from Asia for crossbreeding with the European honeybee and in their bag pack was the Varroa.
    This was the beginning of all the trouble with the mites round the world.

    What you found on the website is really history and only good for advertising the Russian queens.

    They shipped the fist honeybees to Siberia in the beginning 1900 but not the kind of bees we have now. It was the old dark northern bee with a much stronger cleaning behaviour then our honeybees have right now.

    You can use the Russian queens only in totally isolated areas, as soon as the mate with other drones than pure Russian, the effect are gone in a couple of weeks and your money too.
    I heard some American beekeepers paying lot of money for the queens. We could get these queens much cheaper but there is no interest here because we know how “honest” the R-breeders are.
    All you can use is the first line or you must artificial inseminate the queen with 100% Russian drones.

    In your country live beekeepers who take care of several thousands colonies and I wonder why they not changed to Russian bees? They testing now R-bees in the US for over 10 years and if they are so good there should no other bee race on the whole continent anymore.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Question

    So if its just to advertize the Russian stock then why is the United States Agricultural Department involved with raising and bringing in more Russian bees to distribute them into the beekeeping market?
    I do not use Russian but New World Carniolan, I also use SMR queens and yes I do inseminate my own bees. So far this is the best we have, and we are just trying to speed up the 'resistance' (tolerance) to mites here.
    I just thought that these WEBB sites would shed some light on the question of Russian queens as they pertain to us here.
    I use to have Russian bees but they were the first imports and since they were hybrid they died off in 2 years time. I now have a group of bees doing well with just using FGMO during the summer and in the early spring and late fall I use FGMO with thymol. I will keep using this till I have a bee that is completely tolerant of the mite.
    My set up is placing nucs on top of main hives for winter. The nucs are live or die situation while the main hives are treated for mites. If the nucs make it thru the winter and with no mite control, then they become my next years main hives. This is how I am doing my mite resistance. Not all that scientific but I think it is worth my trying.
    Dan

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    Bjerm2, (Dan)

    Maybe you could reply to this in the Queen breeding section...

    Maybe you could share more how a small operator can do II (AI?). I'm not sure I want to do it in the long run, but in the short run it could speed getting my bees more homogenized by picking the drones that are used.

    It seems like it would be expensive and difficult, but since you're not exactly a big producer, you must have found some inexpensive equipment and methods?


    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited September 09, 2004).]

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Arrow

    MB, no I bit the bullet a while back. Cost me a little over $1,000. I just like to play with the bugs and see how it is slowly (and I mean slowly) working out for me. If your going to get into the business and make money at it you need to sell quite a few queens. This is just a hobby for me.
    By trade I'm an engineer and surveyor so I do have some $ to play with. Best bet is find someone around your area that is set up with AI operation and see if they would be willing to do that for you. I know http://www.ohioqueenbreeders.com/ or http://members.aol.com/queenb95/ (not to sure)
    will inseminate for you if you give them a queen and drones. Something to think about.
    Dan

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I've got russian queens and decided that I'm going to put them to the test... no chemical treatment. About half of my hives swarmed this year (I caught 25 swarms), and both the swarms and the old hives really don't have bad mites (none over 30/day). I think that this is because of the brood cycle break in both situations. The new queens have around a 3 week brood stoppage it seems.

    Now, hives that didn't swarm do seem to have, on average, more mites. I have one hive that had 100/day back in late July, but oddly enough this has fallen to 25/day now, without any treatment whatsoever. Most of the others have around 25/day now also. I use SBB's which help tremendously, and Pierco frames, which I think keeps the cells smaller than wax frames. I probably sacrifice a tiny bit of honey production using russians, but hey... to avoid chemical usage... it's for me.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads