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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Derby, Connecticut USA
    Posts
    2

    Post

    Greetings All,

    Last year my wife and I started our first hive here in Derby, Connecticut. We didn't get any honey but we enjoyed the little critters so much we added a second hive this year. To date we have added 2 medium deeps to both hives and the girls may require another before the end of the month.

    Now my question. Last year we stopped feeding the girls in late June mostly because they stopped taking the syrup and the information I glean from the "For dummies book" said to continue feeding the bees until they stopped taking it.

    This year we are still feeding the girls and they don't seem to be able to get enough. Is this o.k.! Is this why we have the extra deeps full of honey? Should we stop or wait til they stop?

    Curious in Connecticut

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Auburn, Wa
    Posts
    134

    Post

    If you have been feeding them, your honey supers are probally full of tasteless sugarwater honey. you dont feed them if they are thriving and built up. just when they are struggling. let them do what they do.(collect the nectar themselves).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,752

    Post

    You can always keep the sugar water combs for stores. But I don't think you'll be impressed with the taste.

    Probably feeding them has helped them build up well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    I feed the colonies sugar water without the honey supers on, the ones that we would normally take a share of pure honey from...

    So if they are going to winter in two boxes or three boxes, feeding till they get these built up is something I do. Once they have their brood nest and comb built, adding supers for honey is what they'll make for me to take.

    That's why I don't get much 'honey' the first year. I took some honey a few days ago, starting to get a share now. (started late) But I extract and add the wets back on before fall flow.

    If I think they're not making sufficient headway toward winter, I'll start feeding so they can get it cured before the the cold weather hits. I want them to have enough so that they aren't under starving conditions by early spring. The only thing I give in winter is candy or sugar. I don't like to have to feed sugar water in spring.

    So that by June and July, I have real honey in my supers.

    This year I split all my hives that overwintered. Well, They all survived last winter. No losses. But splitting caused me to not get much honey this year. Even though I didn't have to feed them because they have comb, they didn't have enough population to create much excess honey.

    So I went from three hives in winter to six hives and a swarm this year. Seven going into winter. I just want these seven to get through winter well. Hopefully I'll collect lots of honey next year.

    I don't keep bees for lots and lots of honey. I keep them as a hobby. I split and let them make their own queens etc. So it's a slower process then buying bees and queens ect. The weather cooperated in making splits this year.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Derby, Connecticut USA
    Posts
    2

    Post

    Well I knew it was to good to be true...Looks like I stop feeding the girls today. So what do I do with these supers full of sugar water? What are the possibilities of getting any honey? I think my wife is going to cry...she already had most of the "Honey" ear marked for christmas gifts!

    What I don't get is why they never stopped taking the sugar water...they did last year!
    Oh well Live and learn!

    Curious in Connecticut

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,752

    Post

    It's hard to figure bees. But maybe there wasn't the same volume of flow this year that there was last year.

    You can set the supers aside for winter stores and you may yet get some fall honey. It depends on the weather and the bees.

  7. #7
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    What about this idea if you have no other drawn comb....(if you have an extractor!!)

    Spin out the supers, reserving the "contaminated" "honey".

    Put the empty supers of comb back on, if they manage to fill them this fall, take that, then feed back the suger water honey.

    has anybody done anything like that?

    -rick

    [This message has been edited by kookaburra (edited August 09, 2004).]

  8. #8
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    whoops again

    [This message has been edited by kookaburra (edited August 09, 2004).]

  9. #9
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    deleted whoops

    [This message has been edited by kookaburra (edited August 09, 2004).]

  10. #10
    kookaburra Guest

    Post

    Deleted

    [This message has been edited by kookaburra (edited August 09, 2004).]

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