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  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    Hey, I just did a split a week and a half ago. How do I go about using the sealed queen cups to requeen my old queens? OR DO I WANT TO DO THIS? Is it too much trouble?
    I have heard that I can put them n a queen cage to aclimate the other bees.
    What do you suggest??
    Jason G in TN

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    Kill the old queen. Place a closed queen cell that will emerge in 24+- hrs into the hive---press it onto the comb along the top, but very carefully, don't damage/deform the cell itself. The new queen will be accepted when she emerges.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Post

    I haven't tried it until a couple of days ago and I'll let you know how that goes, but if you have little time and a lot of hives, I'd do it in one shot. Kill the queen, and put the cell in, with some kind of protector. The people who have done this tell me to smoke it heavy just before doing this.

    If you have the time and you want better acceptance you can kill the queen and wait 6 to 24 hours and then put the cell in. That way they have time to realize they are queenless and will be less likely to try to tear down the cell.

  4. #4
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    Thanks, very helpful info...maybe will do a combination of smoking and waiting. I didn't keep track of when I put them in so I don't know when they will come out. Will I be able to hear the queens buzzing in their cells from outside the hive and is this an indicator of the time of their emerging??

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Drums, PA, USA
    Posts
    331

    Post

    If you have the time and you want better acceptance you can kill the queen and wait 6 to 24 hours and then put the cell in. That way they have time to realize they are queenless and will be less likely to try to tear down the cell.


    I agree with that. You need to make sure the bees know they are queenless, or they will chew the cell up. I had it happen, when I thought it was queenless. Thats a management error, but it can and will happen.
    Make sure the hive is queenless for at least 6 hours. I would recommend 8, but thats your call. Once they know they are queenless, and get a wiff of the cell, they become almost obsessed with it, until it emerges. The you wait about 10-12 days, and look for eggs. If she mates successfully, and does not get eaten or lost in the process, everything is cool. Otherwise you start all over. I lost 2 queens this year that I have no idea what happened to them!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Some people just put the cell in a protector and stick it in the top of the colony and hope for a forced supercedure.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Depending on how many hives your talking about, I also will just pick a frame with one queen cell and swap the whole frame. I hate messing with moving the actual cell. This of course only works if doing 1 or 2 hives and not on a large scale or when you need to split a frame holding 5-10 swarm cells.

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