Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Chandler, Tx
    Posts
    282

    Post

    We're moving in town to a subdivison in a few months. I will leave the majority of my bees at my parents place but wanted to put a couple hives in the backyard so I don't feel like a total city boy. I was planning to put them as far back as possible aginst the wooden privacy fence. How much room do I need to leave between their entrance and the fence to give them a decent flight pattern? 4 feet? 6 feet?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

    Post

    6" will do. [img]smile.gif[/img] But you might need more room to work them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Chandler, Tx
    Posts
    282

    Post

    Really? So all you need is working room? I guess the closer they are to the fence the higher their flight pattern. That would make them bother the neighboors less I'm sure.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    Michael's right. I helped a couple relocate a hive into a garden shed with maybe 6 inches (they've a very nosey female neighbor). The bees do fine, and they open the doors to work them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,509

    Post

    I have a hive tucked on the side of my house. Clearances are about 6" from the back of the hive to a solid fence, 4' from one side of the hive to the wall of the house, 3' from the other side of the hive to another fence/thicket. The bees prefer to approach and leave the entrance vertically to a height of 15' and then they're off to forage in all directions. Sometimes they'll fly straight in to the front entrance from the street, but not regularly. It's my most productive hive. I'm always amazed at the speed of bees dropping out of the sky straight down to the front of the hive.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    490

    Post

    Ditto the others.
    My back yard hives (3) are within 6" of the back fence. I can barely get my head around the side to view the entrance board. It works well. I garden within a foot of the hives with no problem at all. I enjoy them around and close enough to watch without driving the 12 miles to my others.
    Have fun!
    His Hive Honey Farm - Do all for His glory!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Jamesport Long Island NY
    Posts
    145

    Post

    Hi,
    I had bees on a smallish lot a long time ago. The one and only problem I had was kids liked to throw rocks at the hives. Let me tell you, if you want to see a hot hive you should have seen these girls!

    Bill S

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

    Post

    The cool thing about bees in a town is that people landscape, and water when the ground's dry. That's why they are often the most productive.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hampton, Georgia
    Posts
    68

    Post

    The way I see it with bees in town is that you have two options. One get the okay or at least acceptance from the neighbors. Two don't tell them and they may never know about them.
    When I was fooling with them I had a neighbor that was one of the few that were actually very highly allergic to them. He had to carry an epi-pen on his person at all times. It was not uncommon for the paramedics to be called out two or three times a year. Not from my bees mind you but due to wasps as he would knock down wasp nest as if nothing were wrong. We could always count on this in the early fall when he fired up the fire place. Believe me when I say anaphalactic (sp?) shock is not pretty. I would be inclined to go with the last option but the liability from just one sting to an allergic person is to great. I would try to find out if there was a risk to neighbors that are allergic (of course most folks that don't know any better are allergic when they really aren't). Like any good beek I'm sure you'll try to pave the way with honey and wish you luck. BTW I would always call down to the neighbors to give him a heads up when I was working the bees. Oh, and be sure to check local ordinances on keeping them in town.
    Georgia Wildlife Services, Inc
    www.atlantawildliferemoval.net

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    <but the liability from just one sting to an allergic person is to great.>

    If you're talkin moral liability, I agree. If you mean legal liability, there is none.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

    Post

    IMO, I wouldn't tell any of them. They WILL find out eventually. But that's the point. By then the bees will have been there for some time and the horrible things in their imagination haven't happened. Telling them will just set off thier imagination about something they really can't comprehend.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Newberg, OR USA
    Posts
    146

    Post

    I agree with Michael Bush dont' tell they will figure it out when they get a jar of honey and a handshake.

    Make that a big jar of honey. The urban hive I have is the most productive of all. over 200lbs this year and about 5 nucs where made from it in the spring

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    TideWater Virginia
    Posts
    48

    Post

    I'm with Michael Bush on this one, assuming there isn't an ordinance against bees. But do contact your state apiarist to let him/her know you are getting bees and what suggestions there may be for your area. They also can give you a heads up on problems other beekeepers in your area may have had. I'm in a suburb and resist, on principle, micro-governance. Giving honey to be neighborly is entirely different and should alleviate problems with some neighbors. Some are hopeless, but even a therapist would likely give up on them.

    I doubt there is a liability for a sting. Proving the bee was yours, if it was a bee rather than some other stinging insect (much more likely), would be rather hard.
    <a href=\"http://marcusgriffin.com\" target=\"_blank\">http://marcusgriffin.com</a><br /><br />Be like water, my friend.<br />Bruce Lee

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,423

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