Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sherman, CT USA
    Posts
    36

    Question

    I am a beginning (2nd year) beekeeper in Western Connecticut who has some questions about my first time honey harvest.

    1) The frames of the shallows that I have just taken off the hives have about 50% capped honey in neat, even rows in the middle and 50% uncapped honey in very deep comb (much deeper than the capped honey) all around the outside of the frames. I had to take my shallows off this week because I have found someone who is willing to help me spin the frames.
    a. Is the uncapped honey indicative of a late honey flow, or something else?
    b. Is there anything else that I should be doing for this late honey flow, if that’s what it is?
    2) Using the bee escape for the first time has gone well. Boy, do the bees seem really packed in there after I’ve taken off those honey supers. As I set the hives up for Fall/Winter (medication, wrap, etc.) is there something that I should be doing about this too?
    3) I have seen posts suggesting taking Deeps partially filled with honey and placing them about 100 ft from the hives so that the bees can pick out the honey and tuck it away in the Deeps that are still on the hive. The idea here being to
    a. Not waste the honey.
    b. Not leave a great deal of extra space in the hive for wax moths.
    c. Not cause the bees to work their way up into a super only partially filled with honey.

    Any thoughts here?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. Locally I’ve received conflicting information from only semi-reliable sources and this forum has been a great help in the past!

    Rom Duckworth


    ------------------
    --
    ___________________
    Rommie L. Duckworth
    <RomDuck@snet.net>

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Post

    >a. Is the uncapped honey indicative of a late honey flow, or something else?

    Usually uncapped just isn't dry enough. But it might be. You can crudely test the viscosity by trying to shake it out of the frames, but the only real proof of moisture content is a refractometer. I personally have never bought one and If I had a lot that was 50% capped, (in my climate) I'd stack it up where it can get air through the supers and wait for it to dry some and then extract it.

    >2) Using the bee escape for the first time has gone well. Boy, do the bees seem really packed in there after I’ve taken off those honey supers. As I set the hives up for Fall/Winter (medication, wrap, etc.) is there something that I should be doing about this too?

    I don't like to have them too crowded. Maybe you should leave another box on them.

    >I have seen posts suggesting taking Deeps partially filled with honey and placing them about 100 ft from the hives so that the bees can pick out the honey and tuck it away in the Deeps that are still on the hive.

    Is there still room in the deeps for stores?


  3. #3

    Post

    It could be a late flow, because I got some "more" in the past month (not alot though). This is a little off your subject but I am 10 miles or so south of you in Bethel. How are you doing with the varroa mites? I have them by the hundreds and thousands down here.

    ------------------
    "To bee or not to bee, that is the question"

    [This message has been edited by newbee 101 (edited October 13, 2004).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I have some hives in Warren and often am at that site. (Live in Danbury) Let me know if I can help. I had a few supers of partially capped honey this year. I stacked them in a dry place and covered the top of the stack with a flat board. this board had a small fan mounted in it to draw air through it. This dried the honey enough to bottle. It may have been OK anyway, but I felt better.

    dickm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Ledyard, CT, USA
    Posts
    67

    Post

    >How are you doing with the varroa mites? I have them by the hundreds and thousands down here.

    Hi Guys,

    I am located over in NE Connecticut, and my varroa are almost non-existant.

    -cheers


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads