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Thread: UNUSUAL HIVE

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Just went to bid a removal job, I thought it would be hornets by the discription. You know the usual bees in a bush, on the ground, it wasn't, it's a colony of bees.

    The colony is the size of a basketball and sitting on the ground. It's rained last night and will rain more today, it's very overcast now. They just called with the go ahead, the price was right.

    I plan to just set the colony (the whole ball of wax) in a box, and put a rainproof cover on it and see if it survives the winter.

    Any different ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,069

    Post

    This time of year, that sounds about the best. You can cut it out or drive them out in the spring.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
    Posts
    814

    Post

    I agree with MB on that one. Let them set up house that way and next spring try to cut them out or just let them move up into a 'normal' hive with frames. They should do well for this year.
    Good luck.
    Dan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Smile

    I seen another post somewher on the Beesource that reported several other people getting small late season swarms (myself included) My swarm was about the size of an oversized softball. they were located on a small tree about chest high. I didn't ahve a nuc or any thing small on hand so I took one of my wifes plastic totes (don't tell her) and drill an enterance hole down at the bottom. Put two deep frames in it and have been feeding. They seem to be doing well. If they make it in the spring they will be transfered to a TBH. Depending on our weather this winter I might put another tote over the small tote as weather block, proping it up a little to provide access to the hive tote.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >I seen another post somewher on the Beesource that reported several other people getting small late season swarms (myself included)(SNIP)

    Hi BK28, What is unusual is that this one is a colony, not a swarm. I will have pictures posted early next week. The queen must have not been able to fly or the weather kept them in place too long and they started making wax. The hive is (was) about twelve inches tall and wide, and fifteen inches long. I had to cut off the two outside (small) combs to get them to fit into a deep nuc box.

    I am taking it up to the farm tonight and will put five frames of honey above them. Besides crossing my fingers, that's about all I can do.

    More than likely, if they survive, they should move up into the frames by spring so I can cull out the mound of wax.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Merrimack, NH
    Posts
    159

    Post

    just curious, what is the going rate to remove a swarm of bees?

    if you did find hornets or wasps do you spray them to kill the nest?

    i know my brother a few years back paid somebody to dig up a large chunk of his back yard to remove a nest of wasps.



    ------------------
    NH Beekeeper

    ** Have you seen BeeBlogs.com ?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >just curious, what is the going rate to remove a swarm of bees?

    I charge $50. for simple swarm pickup unless they appear to be dirt poor folks, then I don't charge. I do sometimes charge business's a bit more if it is a difficult capture.

    Colony removals are $200 for the first three hours, $50 per each additional hour. Sometimes it might take an hour, the longest I spent was five hours, that entailed removing the shingles and the subroof. They provide the scaffolding, sometimes I charge $10 per foot extra for heights over ten foot.

    For this unusual hive pickup I charged $100. to the development's contractor. It required three trips to the site. One to bid the job, one to hive the colony, and one to come back after dark to remove it from the site, a total of about 75 driving miles. I could have taken it after hiving, but it was mid-day and I wasn't going to the farm until that night, plus I wanted to take all the bees so there would not be any left to bother the workers that were trying to work in that area.

    >if you did find hornets or wasps do you spray them to kill the nest?

    Hornets, I love em, easy fifty bucks. Take a shovel and a gallon of gas just before dark. Pour some gas on the entrance, chop the ground up, pour more gas, chop some more, dig up the nest for the customers inspection, level ground, collect. My last job insisted that I take an extra $25 tip. I gave them a pound of honey for being so nice.

    See pictures of the unusual hive here:
    http://members.cox.net/bullseyebees/_sgt/m3m2_1.htm


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
    Posts
    174

    Wink

    A true ball of wax - Cool

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Gillett, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    265
    great pics bullseye
    Dee

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Stronghurst,Illinois
    Posts
    168
    Neat site you have there Bill . Sure looks like you have a variety of calls . One day hope to be able to field more of them myself .

    Drifter

    ------------------
    Some can learn by others mistakes , others have to whizz on the electric fence for themslves .

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