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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    953

    Post

    Mid 60s here today so I did an inspection. One hive's queen has become a drone layer so I assume they are trying to supercede her. Every capped brood cell is a drone cell -- no flat brood cappings anywhere. I assumed that if the queen can only raise drones she is unable to fertilize any eggs, and can't successfully raise any queens. I put in a frame that contained some eggs and very small larva from a very strong hive thinking they could raise a queen from one of those eggs if their current attempt wasn't successful. I left the queen cell alone.

    What will emerge from the queen cell: a drone, an inferior queen, or possibly a good queen? I only saw two adult drones in this hive and other hives have a few capped drone cells, but I saw no adults so even if a good queen emerged, I'm not sure how well she would get mated. Temps here are expected to be highs in the mid-50s and lows about 30 for at least the next week or so.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Hotlanta, GA
    Posts
    475

    Post

    I'm not entirely sure, but I believe that the speaker from the georgia bking meeting said that queens can become drone layers when they have very little sperm left, and most eggs aren't fertilized, but they still may produce a few fertilized eggs occasionally. The workers can probably sense that it's a viable egg and made it a supercedure cell. I'd imagine though that during the mating flight, the drones from that same hive are the only drones about and you may get fairly inbred offspring.
    Ask two beekeepers, get three answers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    >I put in a frame that contained some eggs and very small larva from a very strong hive thinking they could raise a queen from one of those eggs if their current attempt wasn't successful. I left the queen cell alone.

    That's what I'd do. At least if I was in Georgia. Here it's much too early to mate a queen.

    >What will emerge from the queen cell: a drone, an inferior queen, or possibly a good queen?

    Why don't you wait and see?

    >I saw no adults so even if a good queen emerged, I'm not sure how well she would get mated.

    Who knows?

    >I'm not entirely sure, but I believe that the speaker from the georgia bking meeting said that queens can become drone layers when they have very little sperm left, and most eggs aren't fertilized, but they still may produce a few fertilized eggs occasionally.

    True.

    >The workers can probably sense that it's a viable egg and made it a supercedure cell.

    I would think but have heard of queen cells built from drones. Of course they did not live.

    > I'd imagine though that during the mating flight, the drones from that same hive are the only drones about and you may get fairly inbred offspring.

    Odds are there are other drones if there are drones there. But who knows if there are enough.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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