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  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    BEEKEEPING For Profit and Pleasure ~ Addison Webb - 1943 HC/DJ
    Is this a good book to use for teaching a course in Beekeeping?
    I am looking for an inexpensive text to use to teach a very simple course in beekeeping (not advanced).
    JG in TN

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    Was this published in 1943? Is Addison Webb the publisher or the author? The nearest I can find to it would be:

    Beekeeping for Fun and Profit by Louise G. Hanson published by Random House.

    If it was written in 1943 I would be concered about coverage of Tracheal and Varroa mites and the viruses that they bring.

    I think the simple version of beekeeping is you put them in a box and steal honey from time to time. Anything else ends up being much more. I suppose the next step up is to do basic managment of the hive and handle the pests.

    I started out with The Hive and the Honey Bee and ABC XYZ. I reread them many times before they started to make a lot of sense, but that's the only way I know to learn. Reality is complex. A simplified version of anything is not really the truth. When I was starting out, I would have prefered a book with a lot in it and a class that focused on the basics within a comprehensive book. That way I could continue the journey after the class.


    [This message has been edited by Michael Bush (edited October 30, 2003).]

  3. #3
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    That's a good question Michael. I don't know.
    The university suggested it for price reasons.
    I agree with you completely. I suppose I need another suggestion for a good text to use then.
    I would like to use the Beekeeping for Dummies, but I wonder if the class would be taken seriously.
    Any ideas?
    JG in TN

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    I couldn't find the book so I don't know what the content is.

    As for anything for Dummies being taken seriously, they sure seem to sell a lot of books for dummies. I don't know what that says for the self esteem of Americans. Personally I refuse to buy a book that insults me. Ignorance is a good reason for me to buy a book, but if I'm a "dummy" what is the point of the book? If it was "Skiing for the ignorant" or whatever suject, I would not be put off by that.

    Anyway, I can't say how other's would respond to the title, except that a lot of people buy them so it must be interupted by them to mean that it is a beginners book which I would think is what you want.

    I used to have a short book by Dadant that was a paperback called First Lessons in Beekeeping. They still publish it and it's only $4.95. I couldn't say how the current one covers pests, because mine is 30 years old, but it was a nice simple beekeeping book with a step by step approach. The original one was published 75 years ago.



  5. #5

    Question

    Jason,
    Please don't be 'put off' by my question, and it's certainly not meant to cast aspersions on your teaching ability but I have to ask. You say, you're getting ready to teach a college (or adult continuing education) level course on beekeeping. I can't help wonder, since you are the instructor, you surely have read many of these titles which have been suggested, correct? I would think that Walter Kelley's book or "First Lessons" or any of the other several beginning-type books that have been suggested, would be suitable (content-wise and price-wise). Your students will take away from the class not only the information given them in a book but perhaps, more importantly, what YOU have to say about the various topics. Undoubtedly, regardless on what book you settle, you will have your own ideas of what topics to place emphases on (that may be slightly 'at odds' with the book's author). Anybody can pick up a book and read and probably (at least, for the most part) figure out how to keep bees. The value YOU offer to the class, is your own experience and your insights into local conditions that affect/influence beekeeping in your immediate area.
    The only general recommendation / comment I have (as has been stated previously), just make sure you're using a fairly current edition - one that at least touches on the topics of AHB, Varroa Mites and Small Hive Beetle problems, etc. If they don't, make up some supplemental "handouts" that cover these topics. There is always much "free" (i.e., not copyrighted) information on the web - usually all government websites (like the honeybee labs), allow you to use their published information. Good luck!

  6. #6
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    I guess all of the books I have read have been quite weighty and technical such as the Hive and the Honeybee which is about 3 inches thick and costs too much for an introductory class.
    This is good advice though...the free info online and government sources.
    thanks again,
    JG in TN

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