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  1. #1
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Any one wanting to talk calmly, about AHb and what the new, verified, findings of AHb, in NY, mean for the future of beekeeping, please join in.

    Those who only want to beat up the beginner of this thread, need not participate.

    mwb

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    Post

    [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
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    Dec 2005
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    Wetumpka, Alabama USA
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    We can only speculate, but I think that hot hives will be requeened and beekeeping will go on as usual.I think that eventually AHBs will get everywhere just like the mites and shb. We might not have as many bareheaded and barehanded beekeepers. Just my opinion.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
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    1,998

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    My hope is that AHb in the Northeast will be diluted/selected out to the point where it is not a big problem. I guess that's what the Texan and the Mexicans before them had also hoped... Still, I understand that 6 agressive african queens were released in the Midwest over a century ago, and they have not taken over yet. The ABC $ XYZ suggests that part of the problem at San Paulo (sp?) was the scale of the importation.

  5. #5
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,341

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    >6 agressive african queens were released in the Midwest over a century ago

    More like a couple of thousand a year for decades. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    http://www.beesource.com/pov/ahb/viciousbee.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    Please let my comments represent 1. new beekeepers 2. who are uneducated in this field.

    I think it means I have a duty to constantly monitor the bees for aggressiveness; to begin an inspection protocol when a marked queen is missing and replaced by a new possibly AHB queen.

    I wonder if all we had was africanized bees, after many generations couldn't we breed a gentle honey producer? I think we can manipulate the concept of natural selection even with a AHB. At some point in human history, the wolf was a competitor, possibly a predator of our ancestors, but now we have turned him into a poodle.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
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    203

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    Here is some links that cover quite a bit about AHB.
    http://www.stingshield.com/lebas.htm

    http://www.lawestvector.org/beebiology.htm

    It has a newer map of the spread of AHB. It seems to me with length of time it has taken them to move up from Mexico there would be more detailed info on areas afected. I look at some sites and 1999 was the latest info.

    Kieran

    [size="1"][ January 11, 2006, 09:17 PM: Message edited by: Murphy ][/size]
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    1,649

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    Here’s an ARS Magazine article from a couple of years ago that’s been posted on BeeSource a time or two before (the map at the bottom is a little outdated now):

    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archiv...4/bees0304.htm

  9. #9
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Come join the fun on the thread, "Let's renovate an Apiary Inspection Program". I'll be glad you did. Thanks,mwb
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    1,725

  11. #11
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    I once again will ask what should be the obvious question, WHERE ARE THESE QUEENS WE ARE USING TO REQUEEN AHB HIVES COMING FROM????!!!
    (capitalized for impact and effect [img]tongue.gif[/img] )

    My thoughts:

    1) Educate, educate, educate ourselves and each other.

    2) Northern Beeks who are wintering in the South will either find ways to successfully winter bees in the north on a large scale or deal with a constant population percentage of AHB.

    3) Northern beeks will need to do nucs and requeening in late summer or early fall to possible access to the soon to be non-existance spring, AHB free queen rearing regions in continental US.

    4)Many/Most Northern Beeks will need to maintain thier own breed stock of queens due to shortages.

    5) Inspectors will have to ask for hazard pay as one by one they get inexplicaply (Mark-sp correction?) stung to death trying to inspect peggjams hives.

    6) after a couple of years of public panic created by the press when a pollintion truck with 1 AHB hive out of 550 flips on I-395 and 300 motorists get stung to death rolling down their windows to yell at the driver for making them late for cocktails, many beeks will go out of the industry and those left will learn to adjust because we are just to opinionated to work pumping gas, our only other qualification.

    [size="1"][ January 14, 2006, 11:48 AM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  12. #12
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    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    "5) Inspectors will have to ask for hazard pay as one by one they get inexplicaply (Mark-sp correction?) stung to death trying to inspect peggjams hives. "

    But hey.......I bought them bees from that character named Joel.....you know the one.........hangs out on the Beesource website
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    hidalgo county texas
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    303

    Post

    well i live down here where they first cam into the states and have friends who have been keeping bees for over 18 and 50 years each and they say the AHB is getting calmer ever year here...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Wyoming
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    At one of the links that was posted above, it mentioned this in case of attack:

    Leave the area quickly if you are attacked by bees. The attack could last until the victim leaves the area. Cover your face using your hands and arms to protect your eyes and mouth from the bees. Seek shelter inside enclosures where the bees cannot enter such as a car, house, tent, or other building.Do not jump into water for protection.
    Why wouldn't you want to jump into water? I would think if a creek was closer than running to my car, why not?
    Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
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    Most of the fatalities of AHB stinging incidents (and most other stinging incidents for that matter) that I've read about regretably almost always involve very young children or senior citizens. The presumption is they either don't know enough to run for cover, or can't get away fast enough. Fast approaching Senior Citizenship myself, I take this seriously. One incident I read about involved a young man doing yard work who disturbed an AHB nest. He ran off down the street... passing an old man. The young man got away. The old man was stung so many times he died.

    Why wouldn't you want to jump into water for protection? I can only guess that you'd be a sitting duck (sorry) when you finally came up for air. They'd probably just setup a holding pattern and wait for you to surface. I once escaped from a seriously riled up colony of white faced hornets by jumping out of the canoe (don't ask) and giving the canoe a push in one direction while I swam under water in the other direction.

    This reminds me of the joke about the 2 men on safari in africa, sitting in camp one day when a tiger comes stalking in. One said "Run! A tiger!" The other man calmly sat down and started putting his sneakers on. The first man cried "What are you doing??? Run! You can't outrun a tiger with those shoes on!" to which the first man replied "No, but I can outrun you..."

    Somewhere in there is a moral or if not a moral, then a hint as to a means, if not a particularly honorable one, of escaping an AHB attack.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  16. #16
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    &gt;Why wouldn't you want to jump into water? I would think if a creek was closer than running to my car, why not?

    As George says they are still there when you come up. Unless you find a way to coast downstream. When I had the psycho buckfasts, I learned one way to get rid of them was run through some brush (not sticker bushes) I have two cedar trees close together but you can get between them. If I ran between them I could loose the ones chasing me. I learned the trick watching the horse get rid of flies in the summer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  17. #17
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    Aug 2005
    Location
    Wyoming
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    Post

    Interesting! Didn't realize they would outwait you...little stinkers.

    Michael, what problem did you have with your Buckfasts?
    Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by...

  18. #18
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    For 25 years, none. Then the second year after I got the queens, all four hive swarmed in the same week, in a drought in August and then all four hives went psycho. Would hunt me down several hundred yards away several days after working the hives and sting me. Pour out of the hives when you even got close to the BACK of the hive. Follow you forever. No fun.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #19
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    Mar 2005
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    ]But hey.......I bought them bees from that character named Joel.....you know the one.........hangs out on the Beesource website]

    YEEEIKES!

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Hey y'all. My son marshall is on a squirts level hockey team. He plays defense. He scored his first goal today. From the blue line. Unfortunately, I was in a meeting, getting elected President of the bored.

    Joel brought up hazard pay. This was something that I thought about last Sept. when our pal ls made his announcement.

    In a normal days work as an Apiary Inspector, it is not unusual to get stung many times per hive. No gloves allowed. So, in an apiary of 40 hives, one probably would expect to get stung, at least 40 times. But it's more like 100 times per 40 hive apiary. It is not uncommon, and for some it is habitual, to work 2 or 3 yards like that in a day. With some small apiarys in between.

    So it is established that to get stung 100 times in one apiary is probably normal. Times two = 200, plus a couple of small apiaries. So you see, stings are normal for Apiary Inspectors.

    So, what happens when an Inspector trys to make a Workers Compensation Claim after getting stung 100 or 200 times at once where the stingers can't be gotten to? He goes to the hospital for treatment and is told not to go back to work again.

    Do you suppose that the Workers Compensation Lawyer is going to let the Judge award that inspector anything? Maybe the hospital costs and treatment costs.

    Any other State employee taking stings like that on the job would probably get quite a bit. In my opinion.

    What do you think?

    While I'm on the subject of Workers Comp. If one person knew that someone else was using an illegal and potentially dangerous chemical in the second person's beehives and didn't warn anyone, what would you call that? And let's say that an Apiary Inspector went into the second persons beehives and received a chemical burn from some substance that was contacted in those treated beehives. Is anyone at fault? Who?
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


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