Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 36 of 36

Thread: SURPRISE

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Question

    >3. Take water off burner and add sugar. Stir well until dissolved.
    4. Add the Wintergreen oil and stir until well mixed.

    I was of the opinion that you should not add the oils until the mixture cooled because they would evaporate from a hot mixture.?

    Also I tried to disolve the lichtin in boiling water,(I used the liquid), and all I ended up with was little globs floating on top of the liquid

    Bill

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Bill, do not boil the water. Heat it till it's steaming but not boiling, take off the heat, add the lecithin granules while stirring the water with wooden spoon and keep stirring and stirring. Then add the sugar, stir till the water is clear, well, stir for a while if you can't tell that water is clear......

    Then add the essential oils. Don't worry that the water is too hot, it's not.

    Stir good. Then bottle it. Two gallons is alot of brood spray.

    I add the apple cidar vinegar in mine. Lemon grass too if you want.

    It will be smooth, no globs and no separated oils.

    If you use the recipe for the brood spray, it has twice the amount of essential oils in it as does the feed. If you want to use it to feed, just add water to dilute the essential oils concentration. Then add more sugar if you want the sugar concentration up'd.

    My bees have perked up since I started using this. I have stronger hives and the populations are coming up.

    But, you have to make these judgements for yourself. Maybe using this on one hive to see how you like it before doing them all.

    It's being used to spray every week and more often then that. But I don't spray more then once a week. If that. You just have to go with your gut feelings.


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

    Post

    Bullseye Bill,
    icq is one of the first instant messaging and contact management clients.
    www.icq.com

    AOL has bought it a while ago, and so if you have AIM, you can connect to ICQ users. But ICQ is more feature rich.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    If wintergreen in the brood helps interfere with the reproduction of the varroa, wouldn't it be easier to add it to FGMO and fog it into the hive? Much less labor involved. Also, anytime there isn't a flow you could pull supers and just feed it and the bees will feed it to the brood.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    I had that same idea about fogging it in mixed with mineral oil,but never had time to work on it.Seems logical .

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    Actually, I didn't intend to try it, but I have FGMO around that I had put wintergreen in and had been painting on the top bars. Since I wanted to try the fogger when I first got it, and since I had the FMGO with wintergreen handy, I used it. I can't say if it made any difference or not, since I hadn't tried the FGMO before, but I know I had a few mites in some of the hives before I started and at least one was heavily infested. I haven't seen a mite in any of them now in months.

    That was early in the spring and since I've run out of that oil and have been using straight FGMO.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Micheal, what if.....

    What If the wintergreen mixture sprayed on the frame where the queen lays, causes a change in the scent of the hive, causing the colony to build supercedure cells.

    You could create the feed that could feed and nourish the bees and eggs, that interupt to varroa, then you could create a spray to be used in say, July that could be used to cause supercedure of the old queens, then you wouldn't have to requeen in the fall, you'd go into fall with a young laying queen, or if not, you'd know by fall if she was fit to overwinter before you purchased new queens.

    If this doesn't sound too crazy, I may try this next year to see how it works.


  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    >What If the wintergreen mixture sprayed on the frame where the queen lays, causes a change in the scent of the hive, causing the colony to build supercedure cells.

    I have no idea if it would work. I have heard of getting FGMO with wintergreen on a queen and the bees rejecting her. But I really don't know how predictable a supercedure would be. I think a more reliable plan would be to pull a frame or two of brood up and put it on top of an excluder on the top super. They will almost always raise a new queen because the scent of the other one is several boxes below. Then you could just move those frames with the queen back down to the bottom and there would be two queens for a while. Usually the bees will get rid of the old one after a while. I never figured out how. I'm guessing they just stop feeding her.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >If wintergreen in the brood helps interfere with the reproduction of the varroa, wouldn't it be easier to add it to FGMO and fog it into the hive? Much less labor involved.

    Don't let Dr. R hear you talk like that, you'll get scolded.

    Fearfull of the FGMO god

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >that could be used to cause supercedure of the old queens, then you wouldn't have to requeen in the fall,

    I think that you would lose a considerable amount of bees leaving with the old queen. I would not want to weaken my hives late in the year.

    Bill

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >>I use wintergreen, spearmint, and lemongrass. I have been having trouble making the lechtin disolve so I sometimes leave it out.

    MB said-
    >You have to add boiling water to the lecithin, disolve it, and then wait for it to cool. I just mix the oils with honey first and then when they have had some time to permeate the honey, I mix it with syrup. Honey is a natural emolient (as is lecithin and glycerin). You need something to get the oils to dissolve in the syrup or they will just set on top.


    OK, I went out and bought some lecithin granuals and life is good again. Before I did, I tried one last time to make the liquid dissolve with no luck. My advise is do not buy the liquid licithin! The granuals work fine.
    Thanks,

    HBH Bill


  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    >>that could be used to cause supercedure of the old queens, then you wouldn't have to requeen in the fall,
    >I think that you would lose a considerable amount of bees leaving with the old queen. I would not want to weaken my hives late in the year.

    I don't think they will leave if the bees supercede the queen. They will just replace her.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Good idea Micheal.......

    Bill, People who requeen in the fall don't seem to have these concerns. By doing this in July the bees would be up by fall honey flow and have time to get the numbers up for winter..... I'm just thinking out loud.

    And yes, use granules.

    Did you make that two gallon batch? I like it because it's so versatile. You can use it as a spray on the bees instead of smoke, you can spray it on the brood. You can water it down and add more sugar and feed it to them. I have used it to keep a guard bee from stinging me. And you can add whichever oils you need for whatever you need.

    I amagine you could make the basic syrup, jug it, then put whatever oils you need after it's been poured off into your spray bottle.

    All I know is, I had some sick bees but now they are doing great.

    There were tiny tiny things on the floor one day, I think it was those varroa babies coming out of the cells of emerging bees. I really do. I haven't seen any mature varroa on the floor in a few days now. I'm going to switch out bottom boards in a week or so, and clean them. I'm thinking they'll be pretty clean going into fall.

    And about Dr R. He was a beekeeper for 65 years? Did he invent that steam treatment?

    I think this is a horrible idea.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,427

    Post

    >And about Dr R. He was a beekeeper for 65 years? Did he invent that steam treatment?

    No, he came up with fogging FGMO with an insect fogger. It's an inert chemical and I've had good luck with it so far.

    >I think this is a horrible idea.

    Steam? FGMO fog? Why?


  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >I don't think they will leave if the bees supercede the queen. They will just replace her.

    I still haven't gotten over my OB hive turmoil.

    When they superceded the queen left and about 3/4 of the population. Sounds like a swarm, but the cell was up high on the frame, hence I thought it was called supercedure. Other cells that never hatched were even higher, those cells are dissapearing slowly.

    Unfortunately, now my hive has no queen, maybe the cell hatched and she died, or she crawled back in and never came out. Whatever, I still have a bad situation and I would not want to repeat it in a full size colony by forcing it to happen.

    Queenless in Cowtown

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >And yes, use granules.

    Works MUCH better!

    >Did you make that two gallon batch?

    No, I make 1/2 gallon batches of my own version of Honey-B-Healthy and use it in my syrup. I make up about fifteen gallons of feed each week for weekend use.

    > I like it because it's so versatile. You can use it as a spray on the bees instead of smoke, you can spray it on the brood. You can water it down and add more sugar and feed it to them. I have used it to keep a guard bee from stinging me. And you can add whichever oils you need for whatever you need.

    I do all of that too.

    >I amagine you could make the basic syrup, jug it, then put whatever oils you need after it's been poured off into your spray bottle.

    Ditto, except I mix it before I put it in my sprayer.

    >There were tiny tiny things on the floor one day, I think it was those varroa babies coming out of the cells of emerging bees. I really do.

    Get a magnafing glass, there is a lot of different things on the bottom boards.

    > I haven't seen any mature varroa on the floor in a few days now. I'm going to switch out bottom boards in a week or so, and clean them. I'm thinking they'll be pretty clean going into fall.

    This time of year I keep them off unless I want to get an idea of how many mites are dropping off, and then the normal is to count how many drop off in a twentyfour hour period. I have so few that I normally leave them on for a week at a time to find enough to count, if any.

    If you have any FGMO on hand, paint your bottom boards with it and the mites will stick to it. That also makes it easier to count them, they can't crawl off.

    Sweet and Healthy in Cowtown


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads