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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    261

    Post

    I wasn't sure whether it was actually making MS better or just slowing it down. Thanks for clarifying. I have an aunt with MS, and maybe I should mention this to her. Does anyone have a link to a well-thought-out report on bee stings and MS?
    Central IL... where there are more hogs than people and more soybeans than hogs and people put together.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lenexa, Kansas
    Posts
    445

    Post

    well, i have BEEN stung, and it didn't help. I hesitate to get stung too often because I am concerned that I might develope an allergy to honey bee stungs.

    I have also heard the reports, perhaps it works better on some people than on others.

    MS is an auto immune disease, and diabetes might have an autoimmune componant. I have both. Allergies are ALSO an autoimmune problem, and I get allergy shots to prevent asthma in the spring.

    Tysabri is the hottest new MS drug, but I tried it and I am allergic to THAT, too! I got hives. The neurologist is pretty sure I CAN take it if it is given after steroids and antihystamined, but he wants somebody else to be the guinea pig. He would be willing to try in a year or so, after someone else had done it.

    On the GREAT side, they have found that some statins (commonly given for high cholesterol) have shown a 44% reduction in the lesions from MS, after only 3 months. They are running tests on human subjects right now.

    I am currently on an anticholesterol med, (not a statin) so on Monday I will call my Doctor about switching to one of the statins. They have also changed my MS meds to something hopefully more effective.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    261

    Post

    I think the sting therapy is area-specific. Getting stung in the hand doesn't help back pain, etc. Maybe that's why you didn't notice any relief.
    Central IL... where there are more hogs than people and more soybeans than hogs and people put together.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Sting therapy is also cumulative, and both frequency of stings and time allowed for the venom sac to inject poison are components in effectiveness.

    east, also it does show promise, both for MS and diabetic (or other caused) neuropathy, in improving the situation rather than just slowing or stopping symptom progression.

    Terri, it is not an ALWAYS thing, and I'd seek a doctor's advise first if I were in your situation, but reactions to bee stings, unlike many allergic reactions, are often, perhaps usually, regressive, that is degree of allergic sensitivity goes down rather than up. As a teen I was extremely allergic to bee stings, but now a sting never results in more than very localized reddening (perhaps an inch diameter circle) that is gone in 10-15 minutes. This is with my removing the stinger immediately...I'm not sure exactly what would happen if I let it sit there and pump away till empty, but I'm probably going to start finding out in the next week or two. I have arthritis in both knees and am going to try sting therapy for it and see what happens.

    Later...right now it's back to the bee yard.

    BubbaBob

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Central IL
    Posts
    261

    Post

    From the study that I read (someone here had the link), after 2 seconds or so you've gotten almost all of the poison anyway. Doesn't hurt to let it pump a bit longer though. The danger is that the barb works it's way deeper as it goes.
    Central IL... where there are more hogs than people and more soybeans than hogs and people put together.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    I use venom theorpy for my back injury. It works great on the muscle spasms. I hope it helps the nerves rebuild.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    Hillbilly, I raise mushrooms too and there is a particular mushroom that shows promise at stimulating nerve regeneration as well. I don't raise the particular type of mushroom and don't remember the name, but I'll look it up in the next couple of days and let you know what it is.

    BubbaBob

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Quincy, IL
    Posts
    26

    Post

    Well, east_stingray, I will finish my Rheumatology Fellowship in May. My dad kept a few bees when I was a kid (1980s), and I alway wanted to try it myself. After I finished medicial school and finally having a modist income I bought 2 hives (new) and package bees. Since then I'm up to 22 hives. Two of those hives are my dad's. Last summer he entered his honey in the Arkansas State Fair and won "Best in Show." His side-line job is as a cattle farmer. Now, he is more famous as a beekeeper. I think he enjoys having people ask him about the bees.

    I've looked at beekeeping as a profit but there are too many variables for me. If you plan to become a specialist you could indirectly make beekeeping profitable. You send a couple jars of honey (spring/fall) and maybe a candle to all the physicians in your area as Christmas gifts. They remember you as the "bee guy." You will make much more money from having them know your name than beekeeping would ever bring you.

    By the way, as a specialist in immune system diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, I wonder if lack of exposure to the environment (such as lack of bee stings) may play a role in the initiation of immune mediated processes. Rheumatoid arthritis did not exists prior to about 250 years ago. This is proven by the lack of erosive changes in skeletons from folks who died prior to then. Now it's in all races and continents. There are no infectious etiologies linked to it. The underlying problem is in the immune system attacking the joints. Maybe we just need to "exercise" our immune systems by being exposed to certain things in the environment to keep it from turning on us. Remember, idle hands are the devil's workshop.

    As for bee venom therapy, if you are not allergic and it makes you happy go ahead and do it. That's all I have to say about that.

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