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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Post

    I did my second inspection of the season today. All three hives are full up. I had added medium supers to all three hives back on February 29. All three hives have drawn them out and there's some honey, pollen & brood in various stages in all of them (I purposely didn't put a queen excluder between the hive bodies and the supers because I wanted to give them extra room for whatever they needed it for). The problem is, they are building drone comb on the bottom of the frames and gluing it to the tops of the frames in the box below. They're also putting burr comb between the frames so that when I pull a frame out, it rips the comb to heck--one of the hives even built comb like an additional frame--I guess they want ten frames in their supers. I must've cleaned out at least two cups of drone comb--just so I could get the frames back in! I felt so cruel killing all those drones! So, two questions for the pros. When I look down in the box and see all that burr comb and drone comb, it's quite obvious to me that they're doing great. Can I then just skip a thorough examination so I don't have to rip up my girls' hard work? Second, I examined the drone brood and found a varroa here and there. Only one for one of the hives, but my strongest hive showed quite a few varroa. One of them even had two varroa! I fog them evey five days with FGMO only. Should I be worried?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Post

    It's always a bit of dilemma. I figure as long as everything looks fine, sure you can skip it. Of course if you put ten frames in the super you'll probably have less problems, since that is contributing to the problem of the extra comb and the burr.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Cool

    I think you need to check the mite drop count at least weekly (maybe daily to start with) and keep a running average for each hive. If you see the number spike upwards, you have a problem. If it's flat or declining, bee happy.

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