Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Yankton,SD,US
    Posts
    11

    Question

    I have 3 queens coming this Friday 4/19. Our forcast here in SE South Dakota is for high 40's and cloudy for this coming weekend. I'm concerned about it being too cool to open the hives. Does anyone have any advice on requeening in cool weather? I was thinking about asking my supplier to wait in sending them for awhile. Note: I had determined that 3 of my hives were queenless, no brood/eggs. When opening the hives the bees were very loud as though queenless too. I thought I would try and introduce a queen to these because they all had a lot of bees. John

    ------------------

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Dear John:

    You wrote:
    I have 3 queens coming this Friday 4/19. Our forcast here in SE South Dakota is for high 40's and cloudy for this coming weekend. I'm concerned about it being too cool to open the hives. Does anyone have any advice on requeening in cool weather? I was thinking about asking my supplier to wait in sending them for awhile. Note: I had determined that 3 of my hives were queenless, no brood/eggs. When opening the hives the bees were very loud as though queenless too. I thought I would try and introduce a queen to these because they all had a lot of bees.

    Reply:
    Requeening can be accomplished in temps of the very high 40s, but it is not something done every day.

    Bees break cluster at around 57/58degrees F and are loose clusted down to around 43-44 degrees F. In the high 40s you would be mid-way between.

    While if possible to hold for a day or so provided the queens are kept at room temp in the house and given drops of water and some liquid honey throughout the day, if necessary they can be introduced.

    Only you know of your exact circumstances. If it is to keep the queens alive, you can merely open the hive and pin prick the candy opening and slide the queen cage between to of the center frame topbars of the cluster.

    With bees all around her and her accompanying nurse bees, they will then be taken care of by the cluster for feeding and warmth.Also by the time they chew out the queen candy, she should be accepted by the colony placed into.

    You then recheck in 2-3 days to see if she was released and if not then release her when the weather is warmer, hopefully. If not, let her be and let the colony keep taking care of her. Then check back in another 1-2-3 days. If she is out okay, if not then release her.

    Hope this helps you.

    Regards,

    Dee

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Yankton,SD,US
    Posts
    11

    Smile

    Dee,

    Thanks for the information. I appreciate you responding. I had decided to have my queens ship one week later. On 4/15 we had a record high of 90 degrees and currently it is 39 degrees here in Yankton. The forecast is for upper 60's middle of next week. I guess that is how it goes this time of year for temperature fluctuations. This was the first time I've posted a question to this forum. I've been coming here for advice for a long time now. I can't thank Beesource.com enough for this wonderful service. Thank you, thank you, John

    ------------------

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads