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  1. #1
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    hi folks. I have 100 pecan seedlings coming next month. I plan to graft some, but not all, with stuart scions.

    just wondering if my bees will benefit from the pecans?

    [size="1"][ December 11, 2005, 10:57 PM: Message edited by: FordGuy ][/size]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    College Station, Texas
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    this is a question about which I have never received an adequate answer. also is there anything within the spraying routine for managing pecan production, that would represent a negative impact on the bees?

  3. #3

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    What other varieties are you grafting and where are you getting your rootstock from? After success with apples last year, I'm doing Pecans this year also.

    I have 40 trees. Mature trees around me and at some of my bee yards. I have never seen bees working them.

    Good luck.

  4. #4

    Post

    Large orchards use large fans to aerial spray the trees. Sounds like there would be a negative impact on bees if you kept bees in the orchard.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Williston, NC, USA
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    I have only two pecan trees, but like nursebee, I've never seen my bees work them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    san antonio.texas USA
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    I cant remember where, but I have read that pecan trees are not a major source of pollen or nectar. I wish they were as I have many orchards near me.

  7. #7
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    With commercial operations, there is a spraying program which I am unfamiliar with. Like any such program, one could move the bees off the yard long enough to accomplish the spraying.

    I ordered a total of 500 pecan seedling rootstocks this morning. I previously had a pending order of 100. They can be grafted with improved scions next year, or the year after that. I plan to use 1 strait seedling 2 elliot 3. desirable and 4 stuart.

    To find out whether bees get resources from pecan trees, you would need to catch a female in bloom, or a male with catkins. Has anyone seed a blooming female or male with catkins that did NOT have bees?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
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    First and foremost, the varieties you are about to graft are useless except in a full spray program. If you want some good info on varieties that are scab tolerant, please contact Bill Goff at Auburn University. I have lots of info on varieties and have quite a few of them growing. Scionwood is available from Wes Rice wrice@poncacity.net for a nominal charge. Note, if you call Bill Goff, he might be able to give you more current information. There are a few varieties in evaluation that I don't yet have grafted.

    Read up on varieties at this link:
    http://www.alabamapecangrowers.com/M...ult%20home.asp

    And you might get some use from this thread on Gardenweb (I also posted there as Fusion_power) http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...909218544.html

    The pecan flower does not produce nectar and the pollen is very light and wind blown, so is very rarely collected by any kind of bee especially honeybees. I have seen bees collecting sap from a wounded pecan tree. This is in early spring and is usually a result of damage by sapsuckers. Once normal spring blooms are available, the sap is totally ignored. Grow pecans for the pecan, don't expect anything that will benefit your bees!

    Fusion

  9. #9
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    great information, and you 've really made me re=think my choice of scion.

    Too bad about the bees not using pecans!

    But, it's not all bad.........here's why - the cover crop i will use for between the rows is....clover! ha!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Hamilton, Alabama
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    In that case, read this also.

    http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/pecan.html

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    thank ya fusion power... even an old dog can learn a new trick from time to time...

  12. #12

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    I disagree on the full spray comments on those varieties. Most of the nuts around here are informal plantings. Nut quality varies but has been good this year. Greater than 90% of the nuts I gathered came from unmanaged and unsprayed trees.

    Classic Pecan text: Pecan Production in the Southeast lists 3 of those varieties as being suggested for SC. Seedling trees will produce an unknown nut so are not worth it too me. I think they can also be referred to as natives.

    If you are planting 100-500 trees, you might consider getting a cracker down the road. Crackers are specific to nut size. So if you crack natives and Stuarts you will either need 2 crackers at >4K each or else suffer in quality of your shelled out nutmeat.

    FYI Fusion, those same 3 varieties ARE suggested for orchards in AL. So calling them useless is not factual. Yes there are improved varieties, but they are not as well time tested as Stuarts, they are not as readily available (the largest supplier in NC has never offered any of those in one of the categories on AL site).

    I'd suggest to all growers to join your state association for better local info.

  13. #13

    Post

    I have lots of large native pecans on my property and I have never observed bees foraging them.

    [size="1"][ December 13, 2005, 10:28 AM: Message edited by: Billy Y. ][/size]
    BEE-L snob since 1999
    What's a swarm in April worth?

  14. #14
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    Jan 2005
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    Hamilton, Alabama
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    Joe,

    If you read through the info on the alabama site I linked above, you will find the positives and the negatives of the varieties listed. The Stuart and Desirable scab heavily. Elliot is temperature sensitive. It gets freeze damage in zones 7b and above. If you have the right climate, then Elliot is one of the best to grow but be aware that it is a small nut and as you commented, may require a special cracker. Stuart does moderately well in Missouri and a few other places that are drier than the southeast. As noted, if you are using a full spray program, both Stuart and Desirable may be useful.

    North Carolina and South Carolina do not have pecan evaluation programs of any consequence. Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas do. The search for improved scab tolerant varieties is being aggressively pursued in Alabama and Georgia.

    I didn't cut down on Stuart and Desirable without reason. I can't grow either because of their scab susceptibility. Most southeast states including North and South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana would be better off without these varieties except for commercial production.

    Read through the information and do as much background studying as I have and you will come to the conclusion that there are better alternatives for low input pecan production and especially for the home grower with less than 100 acres of pecans.

    Fusion

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hampton, Georgia
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    Funny most pecans that I gather from are just old pecans in folks yards that receive zero treatment. If you ask the homeowners, if they are the ones that planted the trees, more often than not they will say it was a stuart. Evidently the stuart was highly promoted back in the day. Maybe they are mistaken but then again I don't know.
    Yes, I have seen bees working pecan. Not the catkins or bloom but honeydew. Every few years the leaves will be coated and sometimes drip with honeydew. If there is not a flow on the bees will gather this honeydew. This is not common and is only seen every so often.
    Georgia Wildlife Services, Inc
    www.atlantawildliferemoval.net

  16. #16
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    warrior, regarding the heavy promotion of stuart many years ago, an old timer told me the government actually gavethem away in a program to help landowners pay their taxes. He said you would be given certain trees per acreage just for the purpose of paying taxes. I don't know if he was accurate or not, but it was an interesting story. maybe someone here can confirm.

  17. #17
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    fusion and others, let me ask you this - regarding scab, will I know within the first 2 years whether the variety is susceptible to scab in my particular area? Or do you have to wait a number of years?

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