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  1. #1
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    Feb 2004
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    Texas
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    22

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    I saw a show the other not to long ago where they were using honey bee stings to treat arthritis. My question is to those of you who have been keeping bees for some time now an have been stung alot on your hands. Do you suffer from arthritis or maybe I should ask did arthritis run in your family and you dont suffer from it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    Kansas
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    Arthritis is on my dad's side but not on mom's side....

    I get stung on the hands.

    I have no arthritis anywhere, that I know of...

    Neither of my parents had it...

    They say stings help or prevent it. I hope so.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    When I get stung I think hard, "FIX MY ARTHTITIS." I suspect it does help. I've read that the body may produce a little Cortisone in response to the sting so it may be more than myth.

    Dickm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
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    769

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    A neighbor of mine has severe arthritis in her knees. She told me she went to bee-sting therapy for about two years. At first the stings helped a lot, but the effect diminished over time. At the end she was getting 16 stings per treatment, but no longer getting relief from the arthritis.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,809

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    >When I get stung I think hard, "FIX MY ARTHTITIS." I suspect it does help. I've read that the body may produce a little Cortisone in response to the sting so it may be more than myth.

    >A neighbor of mine has severe arthritis in her knees. She told me she went to bee-sting therapy for about two years. At first the stings helped a lot, but the effect diminished over time. At the end she was getting 16 stings per treatment, but no longer getting relief from the arthritis.

    These two would be consistent with each other. If the effect is from a reaction by the body with cortisone, then the body may react less in time.

    The original premise was based on some statistical research on arthritis and jobs. It was found that beekeepers had virtually no arthritis. For some reason the assumption was made the the only difference between beekeepers and the rest of the population was getting stung and therefore that must be the cause. Of course beekeepers also eat more honey, more pollen, do more outdoors kinds of things, stay more physically fit (lifting boxes full of honey) and tend, from my observation to stay active into later years. Hard to say which of these contributes.

    I've had a severe case of tennis elbow for the last year, but I don't think it's arthritis. I don't have it so that must prove it.

    On a similar note, I have a really bad knot in my muscles that runs from my shoulder blade to my neck and once I got stung right in the middle of it (not on purpose). It was greatly improved for more than six months. It's about time for another treatment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

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    I keep bees, get stung (no veil or bee suit) and yet I have had to make friends with ol' Arthur.

    Who knows how much worse it might be without the bee stings, honey, hard work, etc?

    One thing is certain; a few stings will take your mind off arthritis.
    Ox

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Heyburn, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    48

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    I get stung each year a few times and don't have old aurther. It was very prevelant on my mothers side of the family. When my oldest son was in high school in Simi Valley, California he would get poisen oak very bad. They would not let a student go to school with is. When would get on his arms he would wrap his arms in tissue paper and wear a long sleeve shirt to school. One day we picked up a wild swarm in the food hil.... When we got home he had me look at the back of his hand, it had some poion oak about the size of a dollar and he had a bee sting right in the center of it, it was already starting to go down and within an hour the poison oak was gone. After that when he would get some poison oak we would go out to the bee hive where I would catch a bee and sting him in the poison oak and it always took care of it.
    They even use bee venem at the navy hospital in San Diego. They would use on some of the vets that came back from Vietnam with some jungle problems that would not respond to regular treatments
    hope you all wintered well, Spring is just starting to break, but I still can't get to my hives because of the snow drifts.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >Spring is just starting to break, but I still can't get to my hives because of the snow drifts.

    Just when I was getting jelous of all those people who have been able to get into the hives... I've had a few warm days, but they were too windy. The rest of the time it's raining. I still haven't done a thorough spring inspection, but the drifts have all melted around my hives, although there are still drifts in the ditches beside the road.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Bradenton, FL, and Davenport, IA, USA
    Posts
    930

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    >>One thing is certain; a few stings will take your mind off arthritis.

    I am not exactly sure if I am just weird or what, but bee stings from honey bees just don't hurt. When a bee stings me, if feels more like a drop of very warm but not quite boiling hot water just hit me.

    Wasp, hornet and yellow jacketstings hurt, but I don't think they hurt me as much as other people.

    Also I haven't been keeping bees for a few years now, and it hasn't really diminished much. I am comfortable with bees, stopped using a veil and in fact I am not even purchasing a veil for the bee shipment that I expect to receive sometime this month.

    Am I weird or are many of you this way?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,809

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    Sometimes I can't remember where I got stung a few minutes later. Sometimes it swells and hurts for a couple of weeks. I had one behind my ear once that hurt that long.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Easton, CT
    Posts
    7

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    I had severe arthritis in both elbows. Last year while hiving 2 new colonies I was stung 4-5 times on each arm. I put my bare hands into the ball of bees after shaking them into the hive to move them around so as to put the frames in without squishing them. The day after there was some swelling, the next day itching, and the next day the arthritis was gone---completely, and I haven't had a problem since. Now, I actually look forward to getting stung.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,825

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    I have been getting stung regularly for 33 years, and have gotten both MS and arthritis, both of which are supposed to be helped by bee venom. Yeah right.....

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    22

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    Seems that it might just be how a persons body reacts to the bee sting as to weather or not it helps.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Petersburg, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    16

    Post

    My dad kept bees for 72 years before he died from cancer. He was stung alot, he never wore gloves and only short sleeve shirts. Never complained about arthritis.

    Stephen

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

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    Getting stung has helped with my musle spasms. Aurthor is very much apart of my familly. My sister got stung last summer at the family pic nic and the next day she said her hands and knees were not bothering her. She has asked about venom after I told her there have been studies on it. Her doc does not believe in it but she said when she come down this summer she wants a couple of bees from my hives.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

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    The mother of my wife's grandmother was wheel chair bound for years due to arthrytis when she discovered apytherapy (bee venom therapy). After a little time of getting stings regularly she eventually got rid of the wheel chair.

    Unfortunately, not everybody will benefit of this treatment. Some arthritis cases are surely going to be quite resistant to it.

    I am not a believer in the cortisone rush hypothesis of how bee venom works. There may be a little cortisone released but I bet there is something else. It is really not known what the mechanism is. I am a researcher in biology and one day I hope to work on this to find out. Research has been done on mice and rats that can be induced to develop arthrytic symptoms (in one leg and not in the other, for example). Bee venom does relieve the symptoms of this "artificial" arthrytis in these rats.
    Jorge

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399

    Post

    In Afrikaans we have a saying – “Een man se brood is n’ ander man se dood.” One man’s bread is another mans death. Amazing biology within the sting of the Honey Bee sting and its effects on us humans. What benefits will I derive from being stung by African bees most of my life, I wonder? I must admit so far no ol' Arthur.

    Some web address on apitherapy

    http://www.apitherapy.org/index.html
    http://www.apitherapy.com/
    http://www.beelief.com/


    ------------------
    If a job is worth doing - Then do it well

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399

    Post

    Interesting information from: http://apitherapy-works.com/beevenom.htm


    Bee Venom Components:

    Mellitin
    Pepride
    Apamin
    Hyaluronidase
    Dopamine; and,
    Adolapin
    Bee Venom – its uses:

    Bee venom is an opulent source of biologically very active components. In the Drug category you can find products that have a bearing on bee venom such as, ointments, injections for various diseases, liniments, creams etc.

    ·Used in the case of chronic pain

    ·Used in patients having heart problems

    ·For effective use in trauma patients

    ·For multiple sclerosis

    ·For scars

    ·For spondylitis

    ·For skin ailments

    .For all types of arthritis

    ·For inflammation

    Therapeutic Bee venom is available in the following basic preparations:

    · Whole body extra (Apis Mellifica)

    · Venom Sac extract (Apis Virus)

    · Whole bee venom (Apis Venenum Purum)

    In Germany, Homoeopathic system of alternate medicine used bee venom for the treatment of many ailments.


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    From all the stings I recieve regularly, only the ones on my hands cause any problems. Perhaps just from the swelling in a confined area of skin?

    anyway, i don't have arthritis yet. I did get stung on the neck and then I felt like I had arthritis there. Then I decided that it was because I smacker her so hard I had hurt myself.

    Probably, the most remarkable thing for me is that I no longer see spots like I did before keeping bees. I used to be a cheetah keeper / trainer. When I quit that job and started beekeeping, the spots are gone.. Interestingly so are the elephants I was seeing. So stings must do something good.
    wayacoyote

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >the spots are gone.. Interestingly so are the elephants I was seeing.

    Were they PINK elephants?

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