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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    McGraw,NY,USA
    Posts
    580

    Post

    Does anyone know where to get stats which reflect the difference between crops pollinated by commercial bee keepers and crops left to mother nature. i.e. differences in yeilds.

    Miki ...You might try researching some of the Colleges that have programs dealing with Bees and Pollination ...perhaps Cornell University...or something out of Bee culture ..or other magazines ...Rick

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    784

    Post

    Sorry to restart an old thread - BUT

    I have been selling my spring honey via a sign on my mail box. Today a local farmer stopped by and ask about pollination of his mellon crop. He was so excided to find a local beekeeper he did more talking that I did.

    Since I am just a hobbiest, I had not considered doing pollination, but he ask about renting 3 hives and named a price of $50 per hive. His farm is only about 6 miles from my home so it is not a big problem in delivering the bees or keeping up with my 'fogging' schedule.

    Is there any big concerns that I should worry about - other that getting a basic signed contract.

    In addition to mellons, he said he had about 5 acres of sunflowers and that there were other local produce farms in the area.
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,625

    Post

    Clint, that's a pretty outrageous story you tell. Refusing to pay you is one thing, and that's bad enough. Trying claim your hives are his takes a lot of gall.

    I approve of your approach- bee gone. This country is all to litigious to begin with. Cut your losses and move on.

    FYI, here in Maine they pay $52-$62 per hive, (at 2-3 hives per acre) for about a month of Blueberry pollination.

    JohnBeeMan: It sounds like you have a good opportunity to setup a nice out apiary.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    JohnBeeMan
    GET A CONTRACT!!! In the contract state clearly the price and time allowed also that you take care of the hives and move the hives. Who is responsible for the hives should anyone use pesticides and kill your hives because I have had farmers spray pesticides then notify me 24 hours later. I put the value of the bees in the contract as $250.00 That way I am notified when the farmer or his neighbors are going to do anything
    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    loggermike:&gt;&gt; Almond pollination for the coming season will be in the 45-50 range on average,so 50 per hive isnt excessive.

    I thought that most were getting about $100.00 a hive, well thats what all the articles was saying.
    Ted

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,268

    Post

    Huh? Oh yeah.At the time it seemed 50 was going to be in the ballpark.But things changed rapidly as it became apparent that thousands of hives were dead and dying mainly from varroa that hadnt responded to the treatments.So the price escalated rapidly.I will guess that most went in at around 80 to 85.00.Many others had contracted earlier around 65.00 and honored that price.Last minute orders were close to 100.A very few went for 125.Of course its not possible to know what everyone charged,but my take is that the 100 level was above average,last minute desperation price.Right now I wouldnt even want to guess where prices will be this coming Feb.There could be a glut as everyone seems to have made increase to take advantage of the higher prices.On the other hand varroa is still very much with us and will take its toll before spring.And who can say how many out of state hives will show up? Within a few years as the many thousands of new acres come into production,more hives will be needed than are currently available.Almond pollination is the only bright spot I see in this business.Forget honey.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    LoggerMike:

    I whole heartly agree, pollination is the way to go.

    peggjam
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

    Post

    Almond pollination for the coming season will be in the 45-50 range on average,so 50 per hive isnt excessive
    was written in November of 2003.
    Rob Koss

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Loggermike,
    I agree with what you have posted for last year. Falls into what we received.

    Rob,
    We got 45- in 2003 but knew of beekeepers which received 50-55 which were staying at the same motel as we were.

    They were doing a smaller grove than we were.

    75-82.50 has been the best offer so far we have seen but a couple of people had advertised for hives in ABJ quoting higher prices (over a 100). One offered unloading and placement FOR A FEE (Harris) and the other did not.

    The rest of the almond story:

    In my article in April 2005 ABJ (pros & cons of almond pollination)I did not add as many cons as I could of and was the only thing about the article many commercial beekeepers did not like.

    Here are a few I should have included

    1. bring back varroa which are resistant to Apistan or checkmite which had been working for you.
    2. bringing back AHB & virus problems
    3. theft of hives
    4. theft of frames of brood
    5. theft of queens
    6. not getting paid.

    Have a nice day!

    To cut down theft and also the common mistake of a commercial beekeeper picking up your hives and taking back to their home by mistake. Happens all the time.

    We picked up 72 hives for Doug Perkins which he left in California my mistake. He actually never missed until we called Doug on his cell phone in Texas.

    Tips for California:

    1.Brand clearly all equipment on both ends of brood box .

    hives are pulled in dark and beekeeping crews are given crude maps to find the hives an take to holding yards. May not be the same crew which installed the hives. The hives on one side of the road may belong to one beekeeper and the other side another.

    White unmarked on industry standard pallets is a problem unmarked.

    color other than white helps. I take a spray can and put a dot on mine as they get mixed up even on semis and easy to find mine in a huge holding yard.

    I stamp all frames with
    Busy Bee Acres Apiaries inc.

    I used to brand with BBA but too labor intensive.

    I have had stolen queens & brood but not hives (yet).
    Bob Harrison

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    Clint, Post his exact name and address and send him a link. Tell him you will remove it when he pays for the pollenation.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,268

    Post

    &gt;was written in November of 2003.
    Ha.I didnt see the date either(shoulda put my glasses on).But I knew by Sept. 2004 that prices were going up.Stories were starting to spread about huge losses.


    Bob,I'm glad you chimed in here.I know you talk to many more beekeeps than I do ,so find your comments very informative.
    I thought your almond article was good.Pointing out the cons will keep guys from going in blind.Theft has not been a problem for me(there is an occasional MIA).Someone always steals a comb or two of honey.Almond honey wouldnt be my idea of a treat especially with a checkmite strip next to it!
    Not getting paid isnt as big a problem now but it sometimes was in years past from certain fly by night contractors.
    Crude maps that dont match up with reality happens every year!
    Robbing out of weak hives happens a lot too.Thats where you will get tm resistant afb,resistant mites and all the other goodies.No hive beetles yet or AHB but they arent far off.
    Some years feed needs to be put on(the muddy years).
    Lack of sleep,physical exhaustion,dropped hives,stuck trucks.Gumbo mud globbed on your boots.Holding a flashlight while rewiring something or another.
    On the plus side is the money.And the early buildup.
    --Mike

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    Prices went up partly because many beekeepers stayed home to make a better honey crop in 2004.

    One large grower told me those which stay home to make a honey crop will never pollinate in California again! I laughed then and am still laughing.

    For years the beekeepers kissed the growers ---. Now the worm has turned!

    Loggermike knows what i am about to say but others may not.

    Almond pollination is like musical chairs.

    When you first go to almonds you get the tough almond groves and you wait for a better orchard.
    The first we had wanted a single pallet every 100 yards. We earned our money.

    Another orchard flooded the grove our hives were in. Said we could carry our hives out by hand. We laughed again and got our pallets out by swinger but we cut some big ruts. The grower called and we told him we would be at the grove the next night but not that night as we had told another grower we would come that night.

    When we saw the grower had flooded the grove with our pallets in the grove and the semi due the next day to take back home my partner was going to whip his ass and would had I not been there that night.

    We passed the word and heard the grower did not get bees the next year.

    I have met some really nice orchard owners and several have been very helpful. I was part of a $67,000 pollination contract done on a handshake.To be honest I asked for a contract but the other two beekeepers said he was good for the money. He was! half when they went in and half when they came out!

    The next almond orchard had dykes. Luckily it never rained when moving in or out. They get slick when wet and you can total a truck if you slip off in the orchard or ruin a truck if you slip in the other way into the ditch water run way and your hot truck engine goes under water.

    Need I go on?
    Bob Harrison

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
    Posts
    629

    Post

    In my article on California Pollination you can see the dykes.
    Bob Harrison

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