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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    hyde park Vt.
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    70

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    I was wondering if anyone had some input on bee stings helping MS patients.
    I know for years people have used it for arthirtis. so maybe there is some hope for MS patients too?
    Any info would be great! I just found out my cousin has MS and I would like to try it on her.
    Her doctor has said that he has never heard of such a thing,but then again there is no money for him in bee sting.

  2. #2

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    My doctor already approached me when she found out I had bees about selling live bees to other patients so they could use them for sting therapy!

    A member of the local beeclub told me in November that he used to take celebrex for the arthritis n his hands, however back in May he helped another beekeeper work hives and was stung MANY MANY times on his exposed hands. He said after a few days the swelling went down and his hands have been pain free and flexible since then.

    I haven't heard anything on the MS though...I wonder if there has been any research done? You might check with a source that is accepting of 'non-traditional' treatments (Chiropracters, herbalists etc etc).


    LaRae

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    1,732

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,349

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    I attended a seminar in Ithaca a few years back with the bee lady from Maryland who suffered from MS. She claims excellant results. She got me to sting my back surgery scar 6 times OOOUUUCHH (I fell of a cliff some years ago and crushed some back stuff and had terrible problems). I use it religiously, the difference is amazing and long lasting. I'm almost normal again(physically anyway) She's on the web, I'd search bee+lady+multuple-sclerosis (accept I'd check the spelling first)

    Bee sting venom has no medicinal value per se. What is of value is your bodies reaction to it. The immune system sends major anti-inflamtories to the sight of the sting as well as melatonin (breaks down and softens scar tissue) and cortisol (your bodies natural form of Hydrocortisone (sp) only much more effective). That's what helps me. I use to have my back seize up and go down on the floor. My wife, armed with a bag of frozen peas and a jar of bees, had me on my feet dancing in 5 minutes. I have virutally no problems now.

    [size="1"][ December 28, 2005, 10:00 PM: Message edited by: Joel ][/size]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Tampa Bay Area and Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    27

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    Pat Wagner's, "The Bee Lady", Joel mentioned above, website address is http://www.olg.com/beelady . I purchased her book "How Well Are You Willing To Bee???". It is full of "case history's" of people she has treated. She herself, has MS and most of the people she has started with "Bee Sting Therapy" have had MS. I have tendenitus of the rotator cuff and purchased her book to learn more about her technique. I haven't given it a try yet, as my shoulder is not giving me any problems at present time.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Corralitos, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,247

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    Speaking as an MD, I do doubt there'll be much efficacy of bee venom therapy (I know we're always trying to hide the efficacious and natural therapies from you guys by the by). However, practicing in an area like Santa Cruz County, CA, which has a large number of "alternative" medicine practitioners, I'd also say it likely falls into the category of it can't hurt (if she's non-allergic) and might help. MS is an immune system derangement and bee venom does stimulate some aspects of the immune system. Of course MS is, at least in a sense, a hyperactive immune system problem and you wouldn't want to get it into higher gear per se.

    As an ER doc I'm not exactly an MS expert. There have been a few new medications released for the treatment of MS in the last year or so that are apparently fairly efficacious, although they are not relevant to my practice at present and I'm not familiar with their names. As we all know, the side-effects from our medications are sometimes worse than the disease.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    hyde park Vt.
    Posts
    70

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    santacruzbee-thanks for the advice doc. I guess the doctors in vermont aren't up on all this new stuff.oh and sorry for the little crack about no money in be stings.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,190

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    Bee venom therapy has been used for years to treat various inflamation related conditions such as arthritis. It is surprisingly effective in many cases. My father had arthritis that was occasionally bad enough to need relief. One or two bee stings on his hands was enough to help. Its not a cure for the problem, but it can help.

    The effect on MS is thought to be from diverting the immune system to a much more immediate threat. Instead of attacking the body's own tissue, the invading bee venom is the center of attention. The cortisol produced as a reaction to the venom enhances the ability of damaged tissue to repair itself. No proof is available and I am not a doctor so do your own due diligence.

    Fusion

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    1,966

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    I have an MS friend that tried it. He decided he'd rather have the MS. I suspect the type of MS would be important. I have heard that it works.

    Had a diabetic that came to a workshop I did and he was just getting into beekeeping. He'd messed with a non-healing wound for months with no good results. Bee sting therapy healed his wound. [ this is a serious complication for diabetics} I guess he wanted his treatment right in his back yard.

    It doesn't have to be the stings that actually do the work. The brain may do it and the stings just turn loose the power of this organ. Suggestion is powerful. 25% of patients with severe pain got just as much relief from a shot of water as from a shot of Demerol.

    Nearly the same results were found with acupuncture. Results were the same whether the needles were placed in the "Meridian pathways" or deliberately placed in the wrong place. Both groups were helped relative to a control.

    Dickm

  10. #10

    Post

    I've heard wonderful things about bee sting therapy helping people with arthritis and MS here in New York/Long Island. Some beekeepers in my club sell a small container of live bees to suffererers who wish to get stung. There are also special tweezers I've seen, to gently pick up a live bee and place her on the body part where you want to be stung. It's just too bad that the poor bees die after helping people.
    I (heart) Honeybees

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    124

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    My dad knew an older arthritic dog that when he got to moving too slow, would walk himself over to a hive and irritate the bees into stinging him. He'd be fine with the arthritis for awhile after that. Aren't instincts amazing?
    Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Oceano, California, USA
    Posts
    467

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    With arthritis it definitely works with some people. My wife has been using it for several years now. But you've all heard this before. You know, if I had any brains I would have taken a photo of her finger joint yesterday before I stung it. The swelling really does go down.

    Hmmm. That certainly wouldn't be any sort of proof, since I could be lying about the photos, but still it would be interesting. A before photo of the swollen joint, a next day photo of the hugely swollen finger (she swells) and a one week later photo of the same joint, smaller. Perhaps I'll do it next time. On various internet boards there are lots of people who don't like my extreme right wing politics, but I rarely get called a liar.

    Barry, I do have one story about MS. My best friend's wife has it bad. They in desperation after research asked for a hive. It took her off SOME of the medication, then as has been said she got tired of it and I picked up the hive. A few months later they asked for it again. The only benefit that seemed to come of it was a reduction of pain killing drugs, but that was significant enough to start over again.

    There is also one negative side effect besides the pain. Sometimes an abscess will form a the point where the sting went in.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    933

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    >My doctor already approached me when she found out I had bees about selling live bees to other patients so they could use them for sting therapy!

    Just curious, what is the going rate for live bees and what type of container are they delivered in?

    My mother has arthritis in her hands pretty bad. I offered up a few bees for some sting therapy, but she said that it would have to get MUCH worse before she would voluntarily be stung.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,349

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    If you have arthritis, a few bees in a jar is good. If you have MS you probably need an observation hive or why not a back yard hive. I've never charged anyone needing a few for good health.

    Our Russian Customers will pay big money for dead bees which they make a tea from and drink. (GEEROSSE!) I have no idea what it does but I'll tell you it sure vacates your nostrils in a hurry.

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