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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cheshire, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    56

    Post

    I was wondering if anyone knows if bees like the nectar from thornless Honeylocust trees? Are there any flowering trees that reach 30-50 feet tall that bees like? We are getting ready to do a major landscaping. Thanks for any input!!

  2. #2
    Cedar Vista Guest

    Post

    I am not sure about thornless honeylocust trees, but I have seen American linden and little leaf linden trees just full of bees in June, here in Colorado. Also Northern catalpa, one of my favorites.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    Tulip poplar get large and grow fairly fast and are our number one honey plant. Black locust produces honey but honey locust do not. Black locust have small thorns. Black Gum is another good bee plant but not as dependable as the first two mentioned. Of course fruiting pears get large and are a good build up tree. Maples are all good for spring build up. Red, Silver, and Sugar maples bloom in that order. Another great bee plant is french pus sy willows. They are great pollen for very early spring to get your brood cycle started. A plant that is not a tree but hedge is privet. it has very small white blooms that bees love. It bloom alot stronger than hollies. I prefer hollies to privet in looks and use as a yard plant. You have to watch which Hollies you buy as some do not bloom well/much. I can help if you come across any plant as I was a nurseryman before my back injury.

  4. #4
    rwjedi Guest

    Post

    Yeah HBM I've got a huge tulilp poplar in my back yard so I'm dying to get a hive in my back yard. I'm going to plant a few of the tulip poplars out on my 5 acres next year, they are CHEAP.

    Rod

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    I like them for shade trees as well. If you would like alot of them let me know. I get the liners for around 50 cents each when buying 100 or more. Fall is almost here as well which is digging and planting time. They make good investments as they grow fairly fast and make a good lumber. So a few rows about 6 feet square planting makes a great wind break and gives you a return of lumber and nector. Of all the honey trees they are my favorite for the yard. Locust(black) would be my second because of how much nector it can make on good years as it does not hit every year and the tree is slower growing and not as good for shade.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tiller, Oregon USA
    Posts
    209

    Post

    Any images for us Oregonians to see?

    What's your thoughts on female Ginko Biloba (besides they stink ?)

    ------------------
    the ~ox-{ at www.singingfalls.com
    If this message is edited it is because I have to correct my spelling again. 0_0

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    They are a great herb. Have no idea about honey. I have cleaned and sold alot of seed off them(that is a smelly job). they take years apon years to grow.

  8. #8

    Post

    My inlaws have a thornless honeylocust tree in there backyard. I love the tree. It provides alot of shade and looks unique. I have not seen any bees working it. Alot of moths do seem to like it though.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cheshire, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    56

    Post

    Hey Hillbilly,
    I would be interested in about 15 of the Tulip poplar trees. I have 5.5 acres of pretty open land in the country that I think the trees would do great on. If you can sell them to me great, if not, do you know where I can get them for a fair price?
    Lori

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    I could collect a few liners from the edge of the woods easy. If someone wanted 100 or more liners I would point them to one of 4 nurseries. Won't be long until frost them I can dig them. I would do it for the shipping cost. As I did with several other people last year from here with cuttings. That goes for everyone but supplies will be somewhat limited to what I can find. I ship bare root wrapped with wet paper towels.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cheshire, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    56

    Post

    Sounds great Hillbilly!! Let me know when they will be ready and how you would like payment?(Check, Credit card). You can contact me by email at jeremylori@msn.com
    Thanks a bunch!!

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