Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399

    Post

    The Second International Organic Beekeeping Conference, March 5-7 at the Pfeiffer Center in Chestnut Ridge, New York, is still open for registration.



    The honeybee’s drastic decline will be addressed by experts from three countries. The focus will be how to combat threats such as foulbrood, mites and hive beetles while honoring one of the fundamental principles of organic agriculture: an organism is healthiest when its intrinsic needs are met.



    Lectures and plenary discussions will take place with Gunther Hauk, director of the Pfeiffer Center and author of Toward Saving the Honeybee, Thomas Radetzki, director of one of Germany’s best research apiaries, and Dr. Medhat Nasr, Provincial Apiculturist of Alberta, Canada. Factors that determine the bees’ health and vitality, the impact of conventional agricultural practices on beekeeping, and the latest research into alternative methods of pest and disease control will be explored. In taking stock of our beekeeping practices, we may begin to work toward a true stewardship of these amazing and important creatures.



    For information or to register contact The Pfeiffer Center. Phone: 845-352-5020 ext.20. Email: info@pfeiffercenter.org. Website: www.pfeiffercenter.org.


  2. #2

    Post

    Rob are you going to attend?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399

    Post

    No unfortunately not. That is a very busy time for me here at Kentucky State University. I am preparing for the Queen Raising classes that I will be giving this Spring.

    Are you thinking of going?

    ------------------
    If a job is worth doing - Then do it well

  4. #4
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    > Lectures and plenary discussions will
    > take place with Gunther Hauk, director
    > of the Pfeiffer Center...

    Speaking of the Pfeiffer Center, has anyone else read the Rudolf Steiner book "Bees"?
    As I understand it, the series of lectures
    transcribed in this book became the basis
    for what the Pfeiffer Center calls "Biodynamics".

    I've slogged through this book several
    times, and I have to admit that I just
    can't seem to get a grasp on where he
    was coming from, where he was going,
    or if bees were anything more than an
    abstract symbol for other things.

    If anyone has read it, can anyone explain
    to me what, if anything, these lectures
    had to do with actual beekeeping?

    I'm not trying to be hard-nosed, I have
    spent serious time and money traveling
    long distances to hear people like
    Buckminster Fuller and Ram Dass speak
    whenever I could, so I think I am a
    little more "open minded" than most
    on philosophy.

    But for $185, I can attend multiple
    beekeeping conferences with more than
    3 speakers, and I wonder just what
    possible connection this organization
    might have with actual legit Organic
    beekeeping of the sort that the USDA
    would endorse, and would allow the
    "green dot" on one's honey.

    Anyone have any clues at all?
    Anyone ever been to any of the lectures
    given by Gunther Hauk? (Medhat and Thomas Radetzki need no introduction, of course.)

    jim


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM, USA
    Posts
    54

    Post

    I too have tried to read some of Steiner's stuff on bees. I found it incomprehensible. It also seemed to have nothing to do with current science on bees--it's full of strange assertions, like that the queen is the least mature sort of bee. And the earth, moon, sun, etc., have some spiritual/symbolic significance which Steiner invokes in relation to bees.

    Fortunately for Steiner, the more obscure he is, the more brilliant he is in the eyes of his adherents. If you remark on the obscurity, it just reveals your lack of spiritual insight.

    But, I've heard that biodynamic beekeepers--some of them, at least--are using top-bar hives and may have some interesting things to say about the actual practice of beekeeping. As with Waldorf education (another Steiner thing), I have no use for the theory, but some of the practices can be instructive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,862

    Post

    And people pay money to listen to this crap?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Frankfort, Kentucky
    Posts
    399

    Post

    Ok, Ok, Ok, I am not a supporter of Steiner myself. I simply was passing on information.

    ------------------
    If a job is worth doing - Then do it well

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Post

    reminds me of an old saying I learned at the University "if you are what you eat and you eat at Mr. Donut you are a part of the one because at Mr. Donut everthing tastes the same'.

    4" snow today, ready for spring.

  9. #9

    Post

    Well, any reports from the conference?

    Any videos or mpegs available of lectures?

    Brian Cady

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    I just wanted to pull this thread up to see if there were any updates.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads