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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Tacoma, WA.
    Posts
    9

    Exclamation

    I have one very strong hive and one fairly weak hive. In fact I have been adding honey boxes because all frames are full of bees to the point of having three honey supers on the strong hive.

    Now, Can I take a honey super full of bees and simply place it on the weak hive to strengthen it or will the bee's just go back to the old hive????

    Thanks,

    NW

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,419

    Post

    >Now, Can I take a honey super full of bees and simply place it on the weak hive to strengthen it or will the bee's just go back to the old hive????

    They will just go back tot he old hive.

    You can take some capped (preferably emerging) BROOD from the strong hive and give it to the weak one and they will emerge there and stay there. You can shake nurse bees off of open brood and some of them will stay there.

  3. #3

    Post

    I would just swap places with each hive. Put the strong one were the weak one is and vice versa. Do it midday and the returning field bees will help the weak one.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    NW:

    Rainsridge has the best and easiest solution. However, you should look into the situation to see just why the one hive is so weak.

    There is always some reason why one hive thrives and another does not. Not enough stores? Weak or old queen? Mites? Honeybound?
    Ox

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Carnation, WA, USA
    Posts
    120

    Post

    Oxankle,

    Does "honeybound" mean the frames are mostly full of honey and don't have sufficient room left for brood and pollen?

    Just checking.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,419

    Post

    >Does "honeybound" mean the frames are mostly full of honey and don't have sufficient room left for brood and pollen?

    Basicaly, yes. It means the foragers are filling the brood nest with nectar and/or capped honey and the queen has run out of space to lay. Pulling a few frames of the honey out will help. Sometimes just uncapping the honey will help because the bees will move uncapped honey out of the way, but are reluctant to uncap it and move it.

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