Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Super Problem

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    19

    Post

    Good Evening,

    Thanks to a malfunctioning sump pump I have a super problem that is not covered in any of the bee books out there. I have been on an extended business trip for most of the past six weeks. While I was out of town we had several substiantial rains that resulted in several feet of water in my basement. Normally this is not a problem because my sump pump has always kept the water level under control. Of course it decides to break while I am out of town....

    I am sure you know where this is going. Many of my supers with drawn comb spent a good deal of time under water. After the water had gone down many of the supers were then stuck with water in them because I had them sealed up to prevent wax moth damage. No way for them to air out.

    I took some time offfrom work this afternoon to prepare to super my hives on the 1st. That was when I discovered what had happened while I was gone. When I went into the basement to air them out for a few days before putting them on my hives many of them had a rank, mildew like smell. It was even worse in the extra brood chambers I had that has a little pollen left in the cells. Yuck.

    I took all of the frames out and rinsed them with fresh clean water from my garden hose. I then set all of them out on my back deck to dry out in the sun for a few days.

    Do you think the smell will go away once they have dried out?

    I know about the antibacterial properties of honey and propolis so I am confident the bees may be able to clean up what the water and sun does not?

    Thanks in advance for sharing your thoughts!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    307

    Post

    Sharing thoughts is all I can do since I've had no experience with anything like this. My guess would be the same as yours, that after they air out the bees will be able to take care of things.

    Is there going to be any warping problem with the wood?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    If you think this is just from the humidity in the air, I wouldn't worry too much. If you think the flood got them wet, then personally, I'd just scrap the comb and let the bees rebuild. Flood water is just too nasty.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Post

    http://www.beedata.com/apis-uk/newsl...pis-uk0304.htm

    "...also due to better hygiene in Danish beehives were all honey combs are changed and replaced every year by all Danish beekeepers."

    Maybe we are too frugal on the concept.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    307

    Post

    >> Flood water is just too nasty.

    But was this flood water? If the water came from a malfunctioning sump pump, it's just clean ground water. That's the assumption I made. But you're right; if the water was anything other than clean, there's no telling what contaminants might now be in the supers. And maybe there's no way to tell, so just trashing them might be prudent.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads