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Thread: FOUL BROOD ??

  1. #1
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Question

    What should I do, if anything, to protect against AFB? This is my first year with my own bees and it worries me a bit after hearing all of the horror stories of burning all of the equipment...
    What is the best way to treat? What is the easist way to treat?
    Thank you for your advice in advance!
    Jason G

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    You'll only get foulbrood in old, dark brood comb. That's because old comb has built up spores that cause disease. Also, every 3 weeks a new bee emerges leaving another cocoon skin in the brood comb- which builds up over time leaving a wall of decaying tissue. Not very hygienic. Just change out brood comb at least every 3 years (like the scandanavians do), and you won't get it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    828

    Post

    I give you an idea; hold the comb against the sun and than you hand behind the comb. If you can’t see your hand (shadow) it’s time to cut the old stuff out of the frame. With this procedure you eliminate spores from nosema, chalk brood, stone brood, EFB, and AFB.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    The use of antibiotics to treat AFB doesn't cure the disease. It only masks it, then down the line when you are tired and less diligent it will return.......but it then will most likely be spread as you will have swapped combs from hive to hive by then. I say forget the antibiotics. Burning is 100% effective for certain. I don't like to throw the baby out with the bath water so to speak. I save the bees by doing a colony shake down onto new foundation. Search beesource using afb for more on this.

    Clay

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    Hmmm...well here is the other side: http://www.beeculture.com/beeculture...ct/00oct3.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    That is a good article. I read it when it came out. Funny how there is always two sides :> ) I should have stated on my first post that the methods I recommend are for those intrested in non- chemical beekeeping.

    I had a really good report somewhere about using the shaking method and its efficency. The work was done by european beekeeper/ scientist however.

    Clay

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Anything that can cause dead brood can also let the FB fester to the point of a problem. Moisture concerns, a late spring cold snap, bee starvation and unattended brood, along with a host of other stress deseases, etc, can cause an outbreak.

    If I had to change my foundation every three years and realizing the bee energy spent and lost honey for the year while they are drawing comb, and factoring in the cost of labor and new foundation, I'd would probably hang it up.

    Comb without FB problem can be managed for periods longer than 3 years. There are hives that go year after year for many years that have no problem. This without drugs. There are many factors as to why FB outbreaks. Only when the combination is advantagous to FB is the problem enhanced.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Catonsville, MD. USA
    Posts
    251

    Cool

    FYI:

    You can send comb samples or dead bees for disease diagnosis to:

    Bee Research Labs
    10300 Baltimore Blvd.
    Bldg 476
    Bark East
    Bethesda, MD. 20705

    Their phone #: 301-504-8975

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