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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    74

    Question

    Many thanks to those who replied below; I called Truevalue Hardware and they have 1/8" mesh, which I hope to get tomorrow.

    While I wait, and since it was in the 70's today, I opened the hive and saw the top frames covered with bees that seemEd to enjoy sunning themselves. So I went and got a magnifying glass (5x) and studied them carefully for quite awhile. In all the inspection, I was unable to see a single mite. What are the chances 1) They're there but I didn't see them 2) There aren't any or too few to be concerned about 3) something else.

    I am still going to begin monitoring, as I'm not willing to be surprised, but I was interested that I couldn't see a single one.

    By the way; on the origin of the hive; a friend upstate gave me a hive from his splits last spring. I got it home and set up, and the queen only laid one frame of eggs and then the bees commenced a replacement which I let go. The present queen is laying in beautiful full frames, and the bees are very tame so I have no idea what the background really is but it seems OK now.

    Thank you
    Jack

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,304

    Post

    Most of the mites are in the brood right now.Mites riding on bees are able to hide between the body segments.So if you see them riding on bees you may have a bigger infestation than you think.Open up some drone brood (at least a hundred cells) with a cappings scratcher and see how many are in there.Just slip it under the caps and fork them out.Works best at the purple eye stage.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    >What are the chances 1) They're there but I didn't see them

    99 44/100 percent chance they are there.

    > 2) There aren't any or too few to be concerned about

    Possible, but not an assumption I would make.

    > 3) something else.

    There are almost certainly Varroa mites and you need to monitor them by some method. Pulling drone brood, sugar roll, sticky board, SBB with a tray etc.l
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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