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  1. #1

    Question

    A totally confusing senior moment at that

    Around the 1st of March I made a split and added a queen that I had purchased. The new queen was lightly marked with a small painted dot.

    The end of March the new queen was nowhere to be found, In a second search later in the same day I found an unmarked queen and marked her, I waited a week and decided to check just to make sure this un-marked queen was laying. I found her on the second frame in the hive and lo and behold she wasnÂ’t marked?

    I thought sure the bees had chewed the markings off so I remarked the queen.

    Now here we are close to the end of May and the hive has really been booming, I decided to split it last week so I removed three frames of brood and placed them in a Nuc with a frame of caped honey. I made sure there were eggs in one frame so the bees could make a queen.

    I checked them today and no queen cells, after looking a few seconds I saw why, a very large marked queen on one frame.

    I thought sure that I had found the queen in the original hive and move the frame she was on to the side while I was making my split. :confused:

    I went to the hive the split came from thinking I would see queen cells in it and just a few frames into the inspection I find a large pretty (marked) queen. :confused: :confused:

    This hive had to have two laying queens at the same time and apparently I marked them both at the end of March.

    Have you guys and gals even seen anything like this before ?
    :confused: :confused: :confused:

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Norfolk, Nebraska
    Posts
    136

    Post

    Two laying queens in a colony is not common but happens more than people think. If you take an in depth look through enough colonies you will eventually see it. I have seen this on a handful of occassions.

    Bob Nelson

    [size="1"][ May 23, 2006, 11:32 AM: Message edited by: Bob Nelson ][/size]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    The bees do not read the rules book. They do it there way. Just as soon as you say they act a certain way, they will do the reverse. ALWAYS

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Big Grin

    iddee said it; " The bees do not read the rules book." I try and tell people that it is humans that write the books not the bees. So nature is the best teacher, books give a good (sometimes) guideline.
    "What works for one may not work for all."
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    &gt;Have you guys and gals even seen anything like this before ?

    Yes. I have.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    I think your "OLD-TIMERS" has done kicked in and you done forgot what hive you were working or probably dreamed it all.... you done made it to "GEEZER STATUS" CFF, i TOLD YOU BEFORE YOU WAS CLOSE !!!!!!!!! [img]tongue.gif[/img]
    Ted

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    Ya, I currently have a hive with two laying queens in it, an they wintered this way too. We found both queens laying before we had any drones in the hives. I figured it was mother and daughter. I have found them on the same frame, but different sides before.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  8. #8

    Post

    Well Ted”

    Guess peggjamÂ’s two queen hive may bust your thoughts about my geezer status
    [img]tongue.gif[/img]

  9. #9

    Post

    Does anyone have any theories as to why two queens will tolerate each other in a hive?


    LaRae

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Post

    It's just one of the oddities of nature, I guess. I have half suspected some of the hives located in houses for any length of time develop into colonies with more than one queen simiply because of the size of the cavitiey they are in. In the case of this 2 queen hive, it is proably mother and daughter, eventually one will disappear. But as of two weeks ago they were still laying. I may take a nuc out if they get too strong, with one of the queens.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I accidently found 2 in an OB hive. I watched them for weeks. One would lay while the other stood guard. One was black and the other was yellow.

    dickm

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Williamstown, NJ
    Posts
    60

    Post

    Two queens in one of my hives. The hive built one queen cell, and when I inspected it later it disappeared, and I saw my marked queen. Three weeks later I saw a fresh plump unmarked queen laying in there and thought the marked queen had been superceded. Did another inspection of the frames and found the marked queen two frames away! I freaked, but was tolf that wasn't so unusual. That was last week. I don't know if the marked queen is still there, but I imagine she'll eventually be kicked out.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Charlotte NC
    Posts
    11

    Post

    this is good to read.. I sit and watch the hive entrance to my first hive that I got in April. I saw a virgin queen leave the other day and then i was watching the next day and I saw a virgin coming into the hive, probably the same one on another mating flight.. didnt know what to think since i havent seen any swarms or anything.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    &gt;Does anyone have any theories as to why two queens will tolerate each other in a hive?

    The new queen (daughter) is looking for virgins (not laying queens) to fight. The old queen laying queen (mother) isn't looking for a fight at all. It happens often.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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