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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

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    Greetings . . .

    Do small cell bees drop mites?

    Does anyone have "record" to share?

    If I regress (or buy a resistant queen,) how will I know that my bees do not need treatment?

    Guess I'm asking a "threshold" question [img]smile.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

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    >Do small cell bees drop mites?

    Of course.

    >Does anyone have "record" to share?

    I just look from time to time. I didn't keep records.

    >If I regress (or buy a resistant queen,) how will I know that my bees do not need treatment?

    I guess I look more at trends and more at the time of year. But mine never had enough mites to pay any attention to. In 24 hours you might see between none and 10 depending on the hive and the time of year. Usually just one or two.

    The small cell hives I did oxalic on had about 100 mites per hive average on them. One that wasn't really fully regressed had about 200 mites.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    849

    Post

    we never kept records but we just checked our hives that are almost 4.9 and in three weeks they dropped about 20-50 mites per hive these hives have never been treated with any thing just what we have seen.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    I split a hive in July last year; one split was on a mix of foundation sizes, the other on 4.9. The queens were sisters. Unfortuately I didn't have any mite counts from before the split due to pressure of work.

    The split on nixed sizes consistently dropped about two mites a day up till the end of the active season; I haven't checked since as there won't be much opportunity for mites to breed this time of year. The split on 4.9 increased its drop to about six a day for a while, and then it tailed off to about two by the end of the season. Looking at the trays now, there are a lot less mites than there are on the tray under the first split. Obviously, this is just a casual observation, but it could do with following up more ystematically.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    If I regress and/or requeen w/ a (expensive) "resistant" queen, and still get mites falling on sticky-board, how do I know "regression/resistant queen" is working?

    MrBEE:
    >I look more at trends and more at the time of year.

    Trends????

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    >If I regress and/or requeen w/ a (expensive) "resistant" queen, and still get mites falling on sticky-board, how do I know "regression/resistant queen" is working?

    How many mites are falling? A natural drop of 1 or 2 a day? 50 or 60 a day? If it's more like 1 or 2 a day you're doing well. 50 or 60 not so well. 100 or more your bees probably won't make it.

    >>I look more at trends and more at the time of year.
    >Trends????

    A natural fall of 1 or 2 mites a day in the spring and 3 or 4 a day in the fall isn't much of a trend but if I saw it jump by a lot (say from 1 or 2 a day to 30 or 40 a day) then I'd be worried that there is a trend. Not that 30 or 40 is so scary, but a 20 to 40 times increase is scary. That is a bad trend. That's what I'd be looking for more than just numbers.

    Typically on small cell I've seen between none and two mites a day all through the year.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    >100 or more your bees probably won't make it.
    1) 100 drop when? (time of year)
    2) Probably? (50/50 chance?)
    3) Won't make it? When do they die? (immediatly, several months, next year?)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    1) 100 or more per 24 hours, untreated, probably in the fall, but again a trend is more important.

    2) If you don't do anything, then it's only a matter of time.

    3) Usually in the late fall or early winter.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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