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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    130

    Question

    Well, I just picked up the old extractor from my father's farm where it has been stored for 25 odd years. It is a two basket, galvanized model with quite a bit of rust on the wire baskets and brackets. But it does still turn!

    Anyone have any good ideas how to go about cleaning all that rust off? Are there any safe food grade products on the market that can be used?





  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,809

    Post

    Steel wool. Camcoat. Brushy Mt. has it. Walter T. Kelly has it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    fall city Wa USA
    Posts
    112

    Post

    Yes vinegar will remove the rust. But by the time you bought enough to soak it you could mostlikely buy a new extractor. I also heard that the Zinc racts with the Honey and effects its flavor. Sou you would need to completly seal it in epoxy paint.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    130

    Post

    Thanks for the replies.

    What about muriatic acid? I was told that it works well, with little effort, if you can soak the rusty parts in it. Say, dismantle the inner workings so that it could be soaked in a smaller tub?

    Anyway, just another thought.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,809

    Post

    I guess if you can get it neutralized enough the vinegar or Muratic would work. I always just use elbow grease.

  6. #6

    Post

    Having restored some old tractor parts I will speak on this. There is a paint like substance that would change or eat at rust, when it dried it formed a paintable primer layer without rinsing or cleaning. It seemed to do an okay job, did not require much elbow grease. I'd read the label and know what materials I was working with first (type of metal the extractor was made of) I would use Camcoat to provide a food grade sealant protection to things.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Raymond, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    177

    Post

    The converter stuff Nursebee is talking about usually has phosphoric acid in it that does the converting.... Walmart has it. I use it often for rusty projects, works good. I usually sand/brush it after it dries then paint it with a primer. I don't know how well Camcoat will stick to it, but I would assume there wouldn't be any problem with it sticking to the rust converter. The manufacturer should be able to tell you if you write/call them about it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    130

    Post

    Can you remember the brand name of this rust converter? It sounds like a possibility.

    Again, thanks for the replies.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    942

    Post

    Sounds like Naval Jelly. And no, it's not used to clean belly button lint. It has a very thick consistency and uses phosphoric acid as an active ingredient. I'm not sure I would use it on food surfaces without at least thoroughly removing it or coating it over -- if that's even possible.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Raymond, Mississippi, USA
    Posts
    177

    Post

    Yes, the stuff I wrote previously about is commonly known as "Naval Jelly"... Phos. acid, but after it is dried you can scruff it up a bit and put a topcoat over it... is what I will do with my own galv. extractor I got from Nursebee. The stuff I got recently at Walmart is the same stuff... although I think it was labeled "Rust converter". There was 2 different bottles... one was the thicker jelly, while the other was a lighter liquid labeled as heavy duty I think... no matter, they all work the same way. The thicker jelly is better for vertical areas you may treat.... All I know is I like the stuff a lot, but it is not durable (must be topcoated with some kind of paint or whatever) but it seals and converts the rust very well. and BTW, after the phosphoric acid converts the iron oxide, it is no longer phosphoric acid.... its a metal salt ie: iron phosphate
    Make sure you wear gloves when you use it and don't splash it on you or other things near the job.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,809

    Post

    Naval Jelly is a rust remover. I've used it and it eats the rust off. The rust converter I've used turns the rust into a solid black substance and does not remove it. As it says in the name, it converts it. To what, I'm not sure, but I'd guess some form of Iron Oxide that is more durable, like bluing a gun.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Bellingham WA USA
    Posts
    114

    Post

    there is a spray paint Rustoleum that is supposed to do the converting as well as seal- recommendation to remove excess rust first. Another option might be to have the rusted parts sandblasted first.

  13. #13
    cadetman Guest

    Post

    Go to your local autobody supply dealer and get it there. It goes by the name of "RustMort" and a few others. Just describe it to the counter person and they'll know right away.

    You spray or brush it on and it converts iron oxide (rust) to ferrous sulfate. It is best not to cleant the rust up to agressivly. You can then prime and paint right over it after 24 hours or so.

    Bruce

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