Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Beverly, Mass
    Posts
    300

    Post

    I have an old hay field that I am going to try
    to plant this year. I will probably have to broadcast seed around and won't be able to drill them down. I am hoping for a bloom this year. Any suggestions on a plant that will be able to compete with the grasses. I have clover seed but I am concerned that, it isn't the best choice.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,791

    Post

    Clover is hard to beat. Staggering planting buckwheat could be a good choice. I've been planting the following:

    Dutch white clover to fill in all year, at least if there isn't a drought. (couldn't find any Huban)
    Buckwheat staggered planing to try to fill in gaps. It holds up a bit better to the drought.
    Chicory for fall.
    Goldenrod for fall.
    Aster for fall.

    The clover and Buckwheat seeds are the cheapest and what I planted the most. The Goldenrod was the most expensive and what I bought the least of.

    My theory on planting is just to fill the gaps. The main flow will probably come from somewhere else anyway, but having even a small, steady supply of pollen and nectar keeps the bees going and keeps them from robbing.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    885

    Post

    I'm planting some Hairy Vetch this year to see how it does. It's supposed to be hardy up to like -20 so if it works out, might be an option for you MB. It has the added benefit like clover that it adds nitrogen to the soil.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,791

    Post

    I've also planted Birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa. I haven't tried any vetch.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Wetumpka ,Alabama
    Posts
    510

    Post

    every think about apple trees?
    planted 20 this year , still leaves room for clover under them.
    If you build it they will comb it.<br />Tim Rolan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,791

    Post

    I have planted several of them also several years ago. Three are still alive. [img]smile.gif[/img] Drought and mice and rabbits have been hard on them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    Fruiting pears are just as good fro the bees and less likely to be eaten by rabbits.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Centeral Minnesota
    Posts
    142

    Post

    Speaking of Pear trees, does anybody have them and wasps start to take chunks out of the flesh on the actual pear, and then have honey bees take the juice from them??

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    The yellow jackets open the skin and the bees take the juice. This is with hybred pears like bradford but those that have fruit. It is so late in the fall that the "honey" stay on the hives for winter stores.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,791

    Post

    &gt;Speaking of Pear trees, does anybody have them and wasps start to take chunks out of the flesh on the actual pear, and then have honey bees take the juice from them??

    The bees definitely work the pear juice as do the wasps. I'm guessing it probably is the wasps that break the skin.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads