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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marion, North Carolina
    Posts
    423

    Post

    Well, today was like any other day. Read about a lady wanting to sell some bees. Called her went to look at the bees. Asked if they were gentle and how aggressive they were, she stated, very gentle and that she was just in them yesterday.

    So my father and I went a put our bee suit on just in case. Opened the first hive, they were very aggressive and put the lid on almost immediately. Went to the second hive, it was worse that the first. My dad got stung once on the ankle.

    Within 5 minutes he was complaining that everything was getting dark. He then said he felf real funny. I rushed him to the nearest hospital. By this time he was itching all over and his eyes were blood shot, he skin color was extremely red, like a real bad sunburn.

    Got to the hospital, with 4 different shots and two hours later and a whole IV of Sodium Chloride, we left. He is fine and will be going to an allergist for treatment.

    I told the lady, I was not interested in the bees, and realized this is not the way to spend a gourgous friday evening.

    Anyone else have any stories or similar events.

    Thesurveyor

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    Well, this isn't a new story, but when my Rambo Gals hive was given to me back last September, I took new woodenware, transferred the frames that were salvagable and added some new ones to fill in the gaps. All was well, and the bees seemed to take being messed with very well. I let the hive sit for about a week and decided one early morning before sunrise to go get the girls and bring them to their new home. Being a new beekeeper and all, I thought I would take a little shortcut and strap the hive together instead of using hive staples. So here I am, a small middle-age woman going to pick up a hive of three medium supers, strapped together, all by myself and put it into the bed of my pick-up for the happy homecoming. When I tried to lift the hive, the bottom board slipped and all hell broke loose and I had a fury of bees all around me stinging every place that my bee suit was snug. I got it on the arms where my gloves are elastic, my thighs, all around my ankles and a couple on the knees. I was so exasperated, I left in a big hurry, hive still sitting where I left it, and went to my supplier for hive staples. He kind of kidded me about thinking I could do it she-man style. I went back to the hive, stapled it together, and took my husband to help me when I did bring it home. Fortunately, no allergic reaction, but it did put me to rest for a couple of days while the extreme swelling in my legs and ankles subsided. This hive of bees still has additude, but man, are they industrious. I put up with them just because I admire their toughness and ability to survive what has killed so many of our bees. I don't treat them with any medications or pest control. They don't need it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    I was moving a hive last week and trying to convince my help that it was worth thoroughly attaching everything. We got through that one, but I can't remember how many times I have things slip when moving a hive and the ladies are ALWAYS angry when you're moving a hive. Sometimes they are more docile after a ride down the road, but while moving them they are always excited. I reccomend the strap AND some kind of nailing. Little pieces of plywood a couple of inhces square with little ring shank paneling nails on all four corners of the plywood and the plywood on all four corners of each piece of the hive and the inner covers nailed down with screen wire on the hole work really well. Staples are ok too. A 1 x 2 on each corner that runs from top to bottom, screwed with 1 1/4" deck screws into each component is also nice. The other nice thing about the screws is you can put them in and take them out without hammering on the hive. The bad thing is they leave bigger holes for rot to set in. But you can chaulk them shut afterwards.

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