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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Post

    I'm in the process of trying to find an inexpensive extractor...(on Ebay ancient two-framers seem to go for $250 plus), and am thinking of making a cappings drainer. Can one use regular old hardware cloth supported in a plastic tub? I can easily enough holesaw a port for the drain fitting, and place a brace for uncapping over the tub. Any reason this would be a bad idea?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    The only reservation I would have is a personal fetish of mine. I would have a problem with the "regular hardware cloth". I don't let anything come in contact with my honey except stainless steel or food grade plastic...plus the comb wax the bees fill, of course.

    Hardware cloth is typically galvanized, and honey is acidic, and galvanized and acidic, to me, is a no-no.

    Other than that, it's sounds like a plan to me.

    BTW...hold out on the extractor. Nine frame hand cranked radial extractors in almost new condition can be had for your 250 range if you look hard.

    BubbaBob

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Ben,

    I know that you are an avid brewer, so my suggestion is to rinse the cappings in water, and then use the water for sparging. A little honey never hurts your favorite homebrew recipe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    933

    Post

    >Hardware cloth is typically galvanized

    Maybe it will add a little zinc to the honey [img]smile.gif[/img]

    I agree with Bubbabob. Hold out for a radial. I didn't listen to advice I was given and bought a 2 frame tangential -- and I regret it. With a 9 frame radial, you can extract an entire super with one cranking session. If you get tired of that, you can usually motorize them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Definatly hold out for radial as others have said.

    At resturant supply stores you can get food grade lugs fairly inexpensively. Nest a couple and drill small holes in the upper one.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Post

    What's a lug? Clearly the radials are preferable, but I'd like something for this season's harvest, and budget is a perennial concern. I'd make the unit from the beesource plans, but have no welding or bore-ing equipment, experience or acquaintences. More of a wood, malt, fruit or honey guy!

    Good idea on re-using the honeyed water; I'm a no-sparge brewer so that'll work easily.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Waynesville, NC
    Posts
    112

    Post

    I dont know how it will turn out, but I am starting to make an extractor from 5 gallon buckets, using PVC that has been halved to accomodate the frames. Am still researching the PVC glue and Food grade issue, but figure that if its good enough for drinking water pipes....

    Any thoughts?
    Regards from Western NC!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    Ben,,,, A lug ranges in size. But look like large dish pans. Here's an example on ebay

    http://cgi.ebay.com/1-EACH-RUBBERMAI...QQcmdZViewItem

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Ben, I'll loan you my two framer if you have shallows.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Am still researching the PVC glue

    Don't glue, weld.

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...84313&R=384313

    There are cheaper welding kits out there, I found one for around $120. There are also lots of different types of plastic welding rods made for every type of plastic.

    It took a bit of research, but I found the right one for welding PermaComb. I made deeps by welding two medium frames together for my long hive.

    You can come up with all kinds of uses for a welder like welding two lugs together to make a deeper one.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    You can plastic weld with just a soldering gun which is basically what airless plastic welders are.

    If you can afford it, get a plastic welder as Bill suggests, they are great.

    I just did a pair of ATV fenders and then coated them in truck bed liner.

    PVC is a tough weld though, be sure to wear a respirator. If you can find an alternative that would be good.

  12. #12

    Post

    Ben....I had heard of someone using rubbermaid containers that were stackable to make a cappings drainer.

    I purchased two rubbermaid tubs from Wally World ($10 investment) and I had purchased some #8 screen mesh for various other bee projects. Cut out the bottom of one tub and placed a piece of screen under it and used lathe to hold it in place. (Never thought about using a soldering gun and "welding" the screen into the plastic.)

    Used it this season with out any problems. The only thing I would have done different, was to put a honey gate on it. Oh well, next season.

    BTW...if you want a 2 frame extractor, talk to Roger Eagles on here. He can get you one for $20-$40. The one I got from him was great.
    If you see me runnin' you'd better keep up!
    http://hillshivery.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,183

    Post

    The meat lugs are the same idea as the rubbermaid system Hill's Hivery is mentioning.

    The meat lugs will cost some more but are food grade for sure.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,030

    Post

    Thanks everyone! I did end up finding one on Craigslist in v. good shape; thanks Hawk for your generous offer! Sundance, good idea on the lugs for the foodgrade aspect; I'll check that out. For the cheapies like me, what about the plastic grids that cover fluorescent fixtures in offices for the cappings? They're grid of about half-inch squares, and I've seen them at local building materials recyclers cheap to free... might be less offensive to the honey than zinc?
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Wakefield, MA, USA
    Posts
    225

    Post

    The tangential extractors hold fewer frames but they extract much faster than a small radial. A small radial, say 20 frame or less takes more time to empty the combs due to the short radius. It is a trade-off, but ideally if you have lots of honey to process, you can uncap a load in the same time it takes to spin out a load in the extractor.

    NOTE: There are still 2, 4 or 8 frame *reversible* extractors out there on the market, and they are the most efficient thing for a hobbiest. Faster and better than a radial for sure. Cheap they are not, but if you can find a used one you are all set.

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