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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hocking county, Ohio
    Posts
    31

    Sad

    OK, what are the suggested management practices for a dead hive? I know at least one of my hives is dead, or at least appears to be. Judging by the huge pile of bees at the entrance...

    So, do I leave it alone until spring? Can I introduce a new package in to the hive in spring? How do I make the switch? Any suggestions are appreciated. :confused:
    Frog Pond Acres - a sustainable farm<br /><a href=\"http://www.FPAcres.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.FPAcres.com</a> - come on in for a visit!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    are you sure it is dead and not just the results of drone eviction and robbing?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,299

    Post

    Assuming it is dead,the first thing I do with a dead out is a 'post mortem'.If it died from afb(rare but does happen),I burn it.If it was from a failed queen,starvation , or mites,it gets cleaned out as best as possible, then stored in a dry place till it can be re-stocked next spring with a nuc , swarm or a few pounds of bees and new queen.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    I have found that the dead hives need much less management than the live ones. When hives die the bees are usually inside. The fact that they are outside may mean Nosema or Tracheal mites. In summer, pesticides. There's another excellent thread on diagnosis. Sweep out the dead bees and CLOSE it up until the diagnosis is done. Most disease abates in the absence of bees. NOT AFB or Nosema. Nosema is easily controlled. A new swarm will be happy to clean up the remains.
    &gt;&gt;&gt;huge pile of bees at the entrance&lt;&lt;&lt;

    It depends what you mean by "Huge." Some dead bees are expected and even healthy. On a wrm day 35/40F have a look!

    Dickm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    Put your ear to the hive boxes and listen. A good idication if they are dead or not is any noise. A pile at the entrance sounds more like house cleaning by a live colony this time of year in cold weather.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Post

    I'd say a pile of dead bees in front of the actual entrance is a sign they are still alive, where a pile on the inside may be a dead hive. I'd use a hanger and pull enough dead bees out to make sure the entrance is open. I wouldn't open it up unless the weather is good (45 to 50 F) then you can see what's going on.

    I use the stores from the dead ones to shore up the reserves on the live ones in the spring. Pull empty frames and swap full ones for them.

    If you have freezing weather in the winter, the only real threat to the stores is probably honey bees robbing out the dead hive and mice moving in for room and board. Seal it up enough to keep the mice and bees out and use it for spring stores.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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