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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Has anyone else ever put a queen excluder between the bottom board and the hive body? I don't know if it was the right thing to do or not, but I picked up my first swarm yesterday, they had to sit in a box overnight in my garage while I made up a new hive, etc. I get somewhat concerned that if the bees swarmed they may just turn around and leave the new hive. So I put a queen excluder below them to keep that from happening.

    I'm new at this. Was this a stupid idea?

    Mo
    Leonard W. (Mo) Molberg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,824

    Post

    It is not a bad idea, and is recommended when hiving swarms on small cell foundation. Swarms do sometimes abscond, especially those with virgin queens.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Post

    I have never felt the need to do it with swarms. I do recommend it when installing a package of bees though.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

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    That is what I do for at least a week the bees start to bring nectar and pollen and HOPEFULLY by the end of that time the queen will have started laying. Last year I had a swarm abscond cause I didn't. I also feed them homemade type of "HBH", I also spray the swarm with it lightly before captureing{it appears to keeps them calmer} (Lemon-grass oil, peppermint, a pinch of letchin in sugar water 1:1) boil 1qt water with just a pinch of letchin(?) mix your sugar, let cool, add 6 drops each lemon-grass, and peppermint(wintergreen, tea tree oil, patchouli, or any other essential oil). There is a web site explaining the use of essential oils.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

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    After learning of this technique of "queen includer" I always use it. I'll leave a swarm or newly split hive on it until the queen is laying. However, as is the current case for me, I'll also be mindful of insuring the queen is mated. If not, and she can't get out... problems. If not, and she does get out but can't get back in... problems.

    I hived a swarm from my hive on Wed. and put in 2 empty combs for her to lay in. No eggs yet. If not by tomorrow, I'll remove the "includer".

    Waya
    WayaCoyote

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Of course, this only works well when you are sure you have the queen. If the queen is still outside and you put it on then she can't get IN. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    We usually block the entrance with grass that will take the workers over night to remove. We sometimes use shook-swarm for comb honey production and do use queen excluders under the brood chamber for 2 or 3 days until brood has started. Once they have brood they most likely will stay. We don't leave ithem on any longer as we don't like to trap the drones in the brood nest.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

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    "I hived a swarm from my hive on Wed. and put in 2 empty combs for her to lay in. No eggs yet. If not by tomorrow, I'll remove the "includer"."

    You have to be careful with trapping a queen in the hive. There is a limited timeframe for a virgin queen to get her strength to fly and then get mated. If you miss this window, then she will be a drone layer and useless.

    From emergence 5 - 10 days to fly, 5 - 10 days to mate. Most queens that I have raised are mated and laying 28 - 30 days from the egg or 12 to 14 days from emergence.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    And there's the other issue. A virgin queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    92

    Post

    I've seen virgin queens, and they are almost the same size as the workers. Wouln't they be small enough to pass through an excluder?

    Same question regarding a queen who is getting ready to swarm. Workers stop feeding her so that she can shed enough bulk to fly. Wouldn't she also be able to squeeze through an excluder?
    Oyster<br />Concord, CA <br />San Francisco Bay Area

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    &gt;I've seen virgin queens, and they are almost the same size as the workers. Wouln't they be small enough to pass through an excluder?

    Sometimes. They vary in size.

    &gt;Same question regarding a queen who is getting ready to swarm. Workers stop feeding her so that she can shed enough bulk to fly. Wouldn't she also be able to squeeze through an excluder?

    Sometimes, but she's still bigger than a virgin queen is.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    high bridge, nj, usa
    Posts
    68

    Post

    Could a Queen Excluder placed on the bottom of a hive possibly knock some varroa off as the bees pass thru? is it also a drone excluder?
    \"Bee Healthy, Eat Your Honey\"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Post

    Yes it is also a drone excluder. Once there are drones emerging you'll have to either let them out once a day or give up on the queen "includer".
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5

    Post

    Thanks,turns out it might be okay for a short time.

    You learn something every day if you're not careful!

    Mo
    Leonard W. (Mo) Molberg

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