Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Derek Guest

    Post

    Needed; lots of info from any whom want to share their wisdom of bee keeping. I know very basic (almost no) terminology of bee keeping but very determined and inspired. I would like to keep bees if it can be done in a simple (low-tec/no electricity)way if possible or kept to a minimum. I recently inharited some bee stuff not all in the dandiest of condition but may be usable with some guidance. I have about 40 boxes/I guess supers, some filled with frames, some not, some are wired, a couple plastic film, some no wire, a bunch of plastic come sheets, a couple bottoms and tops, some plastic feeders, and two hives that are still hangin out and haven't been bothered for over 2 years until I moved them about 2 weeks ago to our apple orchard where they have taken over the blossoming trees. One hive is 2 boxes high and not very active but theres definatly some bees in there. ( I found that out when I took the lid off).. The other hive is 4 boxes high and looks like an airport on a sunny day. Also have some little boxes that are screened; maybe for the queens?

    I have no extracting eqipment and no protective eqip. no smoker. no medication. no stings yet... nothing but bees and boxes, so what do I do................

    ys Derek

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Naples, Maine
    Posts
    41

    Smile

    Congratulations, you're about to get the "Shotgun" approach to beekeeping !! HA HA. I am also a hobbyist beekeeper and have been learning a lot along the way. Here's my first suggestion, GET YOUR LOCAL BEE INSPECTOR OR MASTER BEEKEEPER TO INSPECT ALL YOUR EQUIPMENT BEFORE YOU GET STARTED. There are a couple of nasty diseases that seriously effect bees. They are European Foulbrood (EFB) and American Foulbrood (AFB). They can completely destroy colonies of bees. This is why I suggest getting an inspection from a highly trained individual. Generally speaking, there are some new ways that people are trying to develope to combat EFB and AFB, but, the traditional way for years has been to completely burn all the equipment that is infected. I hope I didn't scare you from becoming an active beekeeper. There are also some nasty parasites that can raise havoc with your bees. They are Varroa Mites and Tracheal Mites. Both of these pests can be treated with medications. This is another reason for the inspection. Also, you mentioned that you wanted to use low/no electricity means of beekeeping... NO PROBLEM. The bees stay outside, you inspect them on warm sunny days, you can extract the surplus honey with a hand-crank extractor, and if you're willing to be patient, you can even use a sharp knife for uncapping. The only electrical equipment that I use is an electrically heated uncapping knife. If you can become a member of a local beekeeping club or association, you will be able to ask bunches of questions and learn all you need to get started quickly. Also, if you have a local beekeeping supply store, they will usually be happy to answer questions (especially if it leads to sales). If you have access to a well stocked library, you can check out some beekeeping books which will give some good basic information. I have found that you will learn the most from actually working with your bees. They are the best teachers.

    Good Luck,
    Paul B.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,603

    Big Grin

    YE HA!!!! I'll second Paul on the "shotgun" approach
    His remarks are right on. I emphasize the reading part. Get books and read. Also, don't waste time in getting the two existing hives that have bees looked at. If they haven't had any attention in over two years you might have more than just bees in the hives. Good luck. You can always post your questions here, also.

    Regards,
    Barry

  4. #4
    You have ahold of an oppertunity rarely afforded to meny take advantage of the knoledge of leaders that have already been where you are as concerned as you are and get the knoledge from books, other beekeepers, or the internet. Fill your mind with the good things.

    ------------------

  5. #5
    Derek Guest

    Post

    Thanks to all whom replyed-
    I've recently read alot and drilled out info from some knowlegable people. I feel somewhat educated.
    recently borrowed smoker, gloves, extracter, vail, hat and hood, hive tool, frame clamp, and a suit. so I have plenty of someone elses equipment to get started; just need to aquire my own.-(long term).
    Also recently went into bigger hive and found the queen. not so much brood in the hive. don't know if she's too old or just starting out, but thinking to get new queen anyway so I atleast know what breed and temperment I getting.
    Everyone was kind of pissed when I opened the hive and lasted the whole time it was open. the bottom board was rotton so I replaced it with the kind that has a landing strip. Then on top of that, put some type of plastic bottom ( I think its delron plastic) like a cutting board. Then pryed the frames out of the two years worth of mess and cleaned the first brood chamber and frames.
    Cleaned a little on the rest but not as thourogh. Hive was made of 4 brood chambers which had no queen excluder so it made things a little mixed up. But not too much since there wasn't so much brood.
    So I sorted the frames with the the most honey and some all honey and put them in the top 2 chambers and put an excluder between to separate from the two bottom.
    Was very hard to put back together cause frame comb was so large and destorted; kept squishing them so matter how careful I was.
    Looking to buy new foundation and start clean.
    There were alot of bees in there.. alot more than I thought.
    Second hive I opened but then I closed them up cause the others were still pissed and I didn't want them fighting with the small weak hive and stealing what little they have. Will go in soon to check them out.
    Going to put a sugar water enterance feeder on the second hive to help them out.

    Need to know what to do with old supers and brood boxes. can they be steralized some how or used again? Someone suggested to run a propane torch along the inside wood to burn any unwanted organizms.

    Thanks for input from whom replyed. Keep the info comming.

    ys, Derek-



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Location
    Sequim / Wa / USA
    Posts
    175
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Derek:
    Thanks to all whom replyed-
    I've recently read alot and drilled out info from some knowlegable people. I feel somewhat educated.
    recently borrowed smoker, gloves, extracter, vail, hat and hood, hive tool, frame clamp, and a suit. so I have plenty of someone elses equipment to get started; just need to aquire my own.-(long term).
    Also recently went into bigger hive and found the queen. not so much brood in the hive. don't know if she's too old or just starting out, but thinking to get new queen anyway so I atleast know what breed and temperment I getting.
    Everyone was kind of pissed when I opened the hive and lasted the whole time it was open. the bottom board was rotton so I replaced it with the kind that has a landing strip. Then on top of that, put some type of plastic bottom ( I think its delron plastic) like a cutting board. Then pryed the frames out of the two years worth of mess and cleaned the first brood chamber and frames.
    Cleaned a little on the rest but not as thourogh. Hive was made of 4 brood chambers which had no queen excluder so it made things a little mixed up. But not too much since there wasn't so much brood.
    So I sorted the frames with the the most honey and some all honey and put them in the top 2 chambers and put an excluder between to separate from the two bottom.
    Was very hard to put back together cause frame comb was so large and destorted; kept squishing them so matter how careful I was.
    Looking to buy new foundation and start clean.
    There were alot of bees in there.. alot more than I thought.
    Second hive I opened but then I closed them up cause the others were still pissed and I didn't want them fighting with the small weak hive and stealing what little they have. Will go in soon to check them out.
    Going to put a sugar water enterance feeder on the second hive to help them out.

    Need to know what to do with old supers and brood boxes. can they be steralized some how or used again? Someone suggested to run a propane torch along the inside wood to burn any unwanted organizms.

    Thanks for input from whom replyed. Keep the info comming.

    ys, Derek-

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Hi Derek
    You got excellent info from all the members.
    As far as equipment sterilization goes :
    Generally the boxes are not a problem : Torch them as you mentioned with a propane flame after scraping all the mess off , (Propolis and wax) . Boil them in a lye solution. Wash them with "Clorox", irradiate them [Hypothetical, not available here]. Boil them in Parraffin for 10 min at 260 Deg F.Either one of the above will do.
    As far as the combs with woodworks is concerned , depending on the condition of the frames , you can do the same as above. Get rid of the combs and burn them . If you see the plastic , experience is that the bees shunn that stuff unless there is nothing else.Makes random , lousy combs. I have no experience about the NEW plastic foundation but one should use wax covered one's.Old combs can harbor diseases and the cells became tooo small . If you have drawn combs you might experiment with 9 frames instead of ten in the brood chambers as well as the supers .
    Good beeing
    Catfish

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads