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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Whiteville, NC
    Posts
    193

    Post

    From the website:

    Finch Blueberry Nursery is located in eastern central North Carolina on land that is well suited for growing both the southern and northern blueberry families. Started over 50 years ago by Jack Finch, Finch Nursery is now one of the largest and oldest suppliers of blueberry plants in the world. Jack's son, Dan, now runs the nursery, shipping blueberry plants to South America and Europe, as well as throughout North America. Experience, research, and dedication to growing healthy, disease-resistant, blueberry plants assures consumers of receiving quality plants and expert advice for successfully growing luscious blueberries.

    Finch Blueberry Nursery is open Monday - Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM (ET) and may be reached by phoning 1-800-245-4662 or by emailing finchnursery@bbnp.com .

    Disclaimer: I have no business interest in Finch Blueberry Nursery, but I am a satisfied customer.
    GeeB
    Life must be lived forward but understood backwards.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    Like the other folks from Michigan that responded, I see a lot of honeybees busy in our blueberries when they are in blossom. Right now the bushes are if first green up and we are about two weeks away from blossom. It was the reason I started to keep honeybees to increase our berry corp. and so far the production has improved very well. I think blueberry honey is a very good honey and a lot of people ask for it. It is a darker honey with a fruity after taste. Perhaps in the southern states there is more competition for the blueberries when they are im bloom? Here in Michigan it will be the first major blooming plant.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post



    [size="1"][ April 13, 2006, 04:03 PM: Message edited by: Brent Bean ][/size]
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    65

    Post

    For what's its worth, I do know that California has its almond pollination. But here in SW Mich. and especially Grand Junction, the blueberry capital of the world, honeybees are brought in by the semi-loads. There are thousands of hives placed each year right before bloom.
    I have been told, as someone else has said, that they might not be the most sought after blossom for honeybees, but it works here as Brent Bean said because there aren’t that many other blooms at that time.
    As far as the honey, I can not say, but am hoping to get my hives placed in some berries this year to give it a try.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >Grand Junction, the blueberry capital of the world

    Hehehe...
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    65

    Post

    The truth hurts sometimes doesn't it George.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    I can't handle the truth!
    Dulcius ex asperis

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    My blueberry grower will not put my bees on until there is at least 20% of the bushes in open bloom and only one year did I have a problem because the surrounding property had apple trees blooming at the same time as the berries. We have found that if you place the hives throughout the field rather than in one bunch, the berry crop is much greater. The berry crop is 300% higher with bees than without.
    sterlingc

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    collinsville,ms,usa
    Posts
    111

    Post

    at beekeeping school we were taught that honey bees can not get to the nector part of the flower unless the bumble bee ct aslit on the side of the flower. my brother in law took his 15 split to a blue berry farm in feb. the queen cells hatched and had 4 or5 frames of wax built. only one had brood i was proud of him .it was his first time to split his hives. he said only problemhe has 44 hives now instead of 20
    http//www.DeansHoney.notlong.com[/url]

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Honey bees will forage other stuff before blueberries if they can find it, that's why they put on so many hives per acre and wait until the bloom has started- then they really don't have much choice but to work the blueberry. They can work the flowers, but it's not easy for them- the flowers dangle and are deep. Never heard that about the bumblebees slitting the flowers. Not sure I believe that.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Kanosh,Utah
    Posts
    166

    Post

    I have not heard of bumble bees slitting the flowers, but some wasps will chew a hole near the bottom of the blooms on trumpet vines and other deep flowers to get to the nectar and I have seen honey bees take advantage of the wasps work.

    Blessed Bee
    Doug
    May the Great Spirit watch over you as long as the grass grows and the water flows.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    George: laugh all you want the statistics speak for themself, Michigan produces more blueberries than any other state. At one time Benton Harbor Mi. Had the largest fruit market in the world. And you might be surprised that we produce a lot of potatoes as well.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,276

    Post

    Mmm gooood, mashed potatoes topped with blueberry compote. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Rome, GA
    Posts
    274

    Post

    Never heard that about the bumblebees slitting the flowers. Not sure I believe that.
    George, in the south, carpenter bees can't get down through the blueberry flower, so they chew through the side. This behavior is called nectar robbery as polination often does not occur. Honeybees then find these holes (or slits) and obtain nectar as well.

    http://www.ent.uga.edu/bees/Publicat...ar_robbing.pdf
    I've found it easier to keep bees than keep relationships. At least when I'm stung by bees I know why.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada, North of the 50th Parallel
    Posts
    218

    Post

    I've had some blueberry honey that was produced here in Manitoba, and it was very good.
    Happiness comes from within

  16. #36

    Post

    Another satisfied with Finch here.

    I have heard that blueberry nectar requires irrigation at the right time of day to encourage bee flight there.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >George: laugh all you want the statistics speak for themself

    Sigh. I was always under the impression that Maine was the blueberry capital of the world. It just don't seem right, Maine should be the capital of *something* and if not blueberries, then what? Tourists?

    >And you might be surprised that we produce a lot of potatoes as well.

    Nothing surprises me anymore. You got any lobsters?

    >George, in the south, carpenter bees can't get down through the blueberry flower, so they chew through the side.

    Facinating. I can't honestly say I'm surprised. I know bumblebees are preferred for blueberry pollination but nobody does bumblebees commercially and the numbers of wild ones aren't sufficient even in a good year.

    >I have heard that blueberry nectar requires irrigation at the right time of day to encourage bee flight there.

    I know for a fact they don't irrigate blueberries around here, they might elsewhere in the state. There's about 500 acres of blueberries within 1 mile of where I live. They're all commercially pollinated to the tune of about 1500 hives. This place is lousy with bees during the month of May, then they're hauled off someplace else.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,963

    Post

    George is on the right track. I believe Maine is #1 in WILD blueberry production - and Cherryfield Maine is the WILD Blueberry Capitol of the WORLD. Those OTHER berries are ok - but try to use them in pancakes or baking or prepared foods -> they just don't compare to the WILD ONES! Get Real - Get Maine!
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  19. #39
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >George is on the right track.

    Thank you Andrew, I've been accused of being off track, off base, off kilter, off beat, off plumb, off the wall, off my rocker, off target, not to mention just plain awful, offal, and offset so often, it's nice to be vindicated once in a while.

    If these guys want to claim the title of Blueberry Capital of the world... what do I care. I think I got `em on the lobsters, eh?

    >Get Real - Get Maine!

    Ayuh.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    Ok George you got me on the Lobster, can’t say about the tourist? If we could move Chicago to the west cost you might be able to claim that bragging right.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

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